Book Marketing Blogs

by Penny Sansevieri
Beyond the Bookstore: Holding Book Events in Non-Traditional Venues : Tip #37 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
January 7, 2015by: ameeditor
Enter Your Mail Address:

Comments Off

Welcome to Tip #37 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! Want the complete book of tips? Get it here! 

Tip 37Beyond the Bookstore: Holding Book Events in Non-Traditional Venues

If you’re tired of hearing “no” every time you try and secure a book signing, take heart. Signings have become a lot more challenging since more books than ever are being published each year and stores are cutting back on events. What’s an author to do? If you’re hungry for an event and not willing to wade through the endless submission process of a bookstore, consider doing events in non-bookstore markets.

What’s a non-bookstore event? Well, obviously it’s anything outside of a bookstore but more than that, it’s a unique location, likely in your city or town. We’ve done events at video stores, electronics stores, grocery stores, restaurants, coffee shops, even Hallmark stores. When you start to dig into this market, the possibilities are really endless. It’s just a matter of finding a place that will make sense to host your event.

Picking the Right Venue

The first piece of this is picking the right venue. The venue can depend on a few things; first, you might look at the topic of your book to help generate some ideas. We once had an author who wrote a book on wine/movie pairings – pairing the right wine with a movie. I placed this author in a Blockbuster Video and the results were tremendous. I had another author with a computer book and I placed him at a computer store on a busy Saturday afternoon. He sold out of some 65 copies of his book in one afternoon. Another great venue is a Hallmark or some other gift shop. Why? Because people are going to a gift shop or Hallmark for one thing: a gift. Autographed books make great gifts.

Selling the Idea to the Venue

This will take a bit of work because it’s likely that the venue has never even entertained the idea of doing an event, let alone an author signing. You’ll need to make sure they are clear on the WIIFM (what’s in it for me): tell them you’ll be promoting the event, marketing it to the media (which we’ll cover further on in this article). Make sure they know that you’ll handle the book orders (meaning getting the books to the store) if need be. Yes, there is a lot more legwork involved for these events, but the payoff is huge. You may have to sell the books to them on consignment; what that means is that they take the books and can return to you whatever they don’t sell. Encourage the venue, however, to keep a stock in their store after the event in case people come by when you’re gone. I’ve done this before, and nine times out of ten the books never get returned to the author and are sold instead. Also, in many cases the store will often reorder and before you know it, you’re part of their inventory.

The other piece to this is to try, whenever you can, not to go through their corporate offices. Much like doing an event at Starbucks (which I’ve also done) and Hallmark, a pitch to corporate could take weeks and even months to approve. Most stores have the ability to approve from 3-5 events per year, meaning that they can have events at their store without having to go through the corporate offices. Most major corporations do this so that the stores can provide community support without getting bogged down in tedious paperwork for event approval. If you can avoid the red-tape of a corporate approval, do that whenever you can.

Selling the Books

As I mentioned, you will likely have to do a consignment. The inventory part for most major stores gets tricky, and if the books have to be approved for inventory, you’ll end up going through corporate again. More red tape. Try to work with the venue as much as you can so you don’t have to create an inventory of your books. The upside, however, is that if the inventory process is easy, you will be on their reorder list for the future!

Marketing the Event

This is the easy part, believe it or not. Local media loves local authors and while that’s a good foot in the door – the unique venue location will virtually seal the deal. Market yourself to media well in advance of the event and then again the event day. Also, if you’re doing an event in a mall, see if you can get the other stores to participate by doing bookmarks or bag stuffers. Bag stuffers, by the way, are a great way to help the store market your event. You could also do a custom bookmark. With printing so cheap these days, it might be easier to have event-specific bookmarks made up that you can give to the store to help them push the event to their patrons. Make sure you get the store OK first, before you hand them bag stuffers and bookmarks. Also ask if you can create a poster that includes your book cover and the event information. See if you can get a placement on the venue website and perhaps a notification sent to their mailing list. Unlike bookstores that crank out author events all the time, a unique venue that doesn’t see author events all that much will be much more receptive to promotional ideas.

More Venue Ideas

Once you take your eye off of the bookstore focus, the opportunities for book events are endless. Consider the following: street fairs, farmers markets, gyms, yoga studios, wineries, art stores, Starbucks, coffee shops, restaurants, grocery stores, airports. Yes, I said airports. I’ve traveled a great deal and almost every time I go through the San Diego airport, Dallas Fort Worth or San Francisco, I see an author signing their books. Look out for this: if you’re not paying attention you could miss it while rushing to catch your flight.

Other Benefits to Doing Non-Bookstore Events

The benefits of these types of events are pretty significant, especially if speaking and events are part of your marketing tool kit. Book events held in these exclusive markets will not only take you off the track of competing for space in a bookstore, but because they are unique they will draw much more attention both from the media and readers.

Having a traditional book signing is always great. It will help you get into the bookstore market and might even get your book on their shelf. But if bookstores aren’t open to an event, don’t let that discourage you from planning one. Being unique will not only help you gain more attention, but it will help to keep you out of the rejection funnel that often comes from competing in a high-traffic market. Also, venue events outside of bookstores are a fun way to build an audience, get your feet wet doing events and speaking and grow your career as an author!

Share this article with these tweetables:



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – January 5, 2015
January 5, 2015by: Penny
Enter Your Mail Address:

Comments Off

Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. This week features posts on getting published, book marketing, self-publishing, and writing. Thank you to all of the contributors, and Happy New Year!

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted 10 Writing Contests in January 2015 – No Entry Fee posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “Writers should enter writing contests at every given opportunity. Agents and editors take note of who wins writing awards, and it’s a tremendous lift to your platform (not to mention sales) if you can put “award-winning author” on your bio.”

writing advice

writing tips for authors

 

Book Marketing

Sarah Bolme submitted Accessibility posted at Marketing Christian Books, saying, “Are you accessible? In other words, are you easy to approach, reach, or speak with? As an author, this can be important.”

Self-Publishing

Heather Thomson submitted Changing Creative Lanes: Why I Left Hollywood for Self-Publishing (And, Yes, I’m Not Quite Right in the Head) posted at Self-Publishing Review, saying, “Laugh Riot Press writer and founder, Rich Leder, discusses why he left Hollywood and writing screenplays to become a self-published author.”

Writing

Chrys Fey submitted Writing Tips Part Two posted at Write With Fey, saying, “I am sharing my final 25 writing tips.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



How To Get More Sign Ups on Your Newsletter List
January 1, 2015by: ameeditor
Enter Your Mail Address:

1 Comment »

Make sure your subscribe form is visible on your homepage and on every page of your website: Ideally a subscribe form should be on the right hand side of your site, towards the top. Especially if your goal is to increase newsletter signups, you’ll want to be sure this is in a prominent spot.

POSTED more newsletter signups 01012015 - blog_pinGive something to get something: People aren’t willing to give up their email just for the sake of giving it out. Give them something of value, an ethical bribe. Our ethical bribe is 52 Ways to Sell More Books. Make sure the gift is great, get them excited about it. Don’t give a boring gift. Make it something you’d want.

Make it easy to sign up: People don’t like giving you a ton of information online so make your sign up simple. First name, last name and email. The rule of thumb here is that you want to make sure they can sign up in five seconds, or less.

People like what other people like so add testimonials to your sign up form. This is also a great way to capture the fence-riders. You know the folks who said “Well, let me click this and see where it takes me.”

Create a great thank you page and welcome email: This is pretty key and something that’s often forgotten. Show your new subscribers that you really care, welcome them to your list and send them a nice note to thank them for signing up.

Share this article with these tweetables:



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – December 22, 2014
December 22, 2014by: Penny
Enter Your Mail Address:

4 Comments »

Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. This week features posts on writing, self-publishing, and book marketing. Thank you to all of the contributors, and Happy Holidays!

Self-Publishing

Michelle Lowery submitted Pushing Past the Fear and Publishing a Book posted at Michelle Lowery, saying, “It’s about putting fear aside to pursue my dream of being a published author, and how with self-publishing opportunities, there are no more excuses for not doing it. I wrote it about my own experience, but I hope it’s motivational and encouraging to others as well. Thanks for checking it out!”

Writing

Z Zoccolante submitted 6 Ways to Resuscitate Your Novel posted at Marketing Tips for Authors, saying, “6 Ways to Resuscitate Your Novel, shows an important lesson I learned from my literary agent and a few tips all writers must know before and during writing.”

Hand Holding A Social Media 3D Sphere

social media tips for authors

 

Book Marketing

Sarah Bolme submitted Connectivity posted at Marketing Christian Books, saying, “Connectivity can be used in promoting books. The goal is to get people to connect with your message, your book’s cover image, or the book’s story. Once someone has connected with one of these things, they are more likely to purchase your book.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of December 15, 2014
December 19, 2014by: Penny
Enter Your Mail Address:

Comments Off

Prepare for the New Year with insights from these top book marketing tweets to guide you, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include creating a marketing plan, pitching to book reviewers, strengthening your social media marketing, and more. Happy marketing!

**************

* 26 Tips to Strengthen Your Social Media Marketing

Change is good, and with a new year around the corner, it’s time to examine your social media marketing and make improvements:

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/26-tips-strengthen-social-media-marketing/

* 6 Ways to Resuscitate Your Novel

Writers have to learn how to remove elements that don’t move their stories forward:

http://marketingtipsforauthors.com/2014/12/6-ways-resuscitate-novel.html

Tip 34

* Four Tips on What NOT to Say (or Pitch or Do) to Get Your Book Reviewed

Authors always want book reviews, but many shoot themselves in the foot when it comes time to pitch. Learn what to do – and what to avoid:

http://www.amarketingexpert.com/four-tips-not-say-pitch-get-book-reviewed-tip-34-52-ways-market-book/

* 3 Ways Authors Can Stand Out and Market Themselves

It takes planning, work, and creativity – but here are some examples to provide some inspiration:

http://gingergelsheimer.blogspot.com/2014/12/are-you-serious-author-or-are-you-one.html

* How to Reach Readers via Your Library

Play the local card, by pitching yourself as a local author with a new book out:

http://www.selfpublishingadvice.org/local-library/

* How Your Self-Published Book Can Create Multiple Streams of Revenue

You can’t achieve much if readers don’t know about your books. Get some ideas for pre-launch, launch, and post-launch efforts to get your book noticed:

http://www.slideshare.net/KathleenGage/selfpublished-books-can-create-multiple-streams-of-revenue-but-readers-need-to-know-they-exist

* 7 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block

Get some practical suggestions – from an author – on how to get the writing groove back:

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/tip-sheet/article/62947-7-ways-to-beat-writer-s-block.html

* Why and How to Set Book Marketing Goals for 2015

Authors should set book marketing goals. These steps will help you create a strong plan to guide you in the coming year:

http://buildbookbuzz.com/set-book-marketing-goals-for-2015/

* 16 Important Publishing Tips I Picked Up at a Writers Conference

You always learn something at a conference, and one writer shares her top 16 tips:

http://www.blogher.com/who-wants-know-what-i-learned-writers-conference



Why You Want Return Visits to Your Website
December 18, 2014by: ameeditor
Enter Your Mail Address:

2 Comments »

Why you want return visits - blog_pinWhen you look at your analytics, do you get excited about new visitors? Well you should.

New people to your site are great but return visitors are important, too.

Why?

Because a high return visitor rate means you have content worth seeing again and again – in terms of a blog and other website content.

So what are you doing to get return visitors?

This is an important question to ask yourself!

Share this article with these tweetables:



5 Steps for Crafting the Perfect Book Review Pitch: Tip #35 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
December 17, 2014by: ameeditor
Enter Your Mail Address:

Comments Off

Welcome to Tip #35 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books. So, ready? Here we go!

5 Steps for Crafting the Perfect Book Review Pitch

Tip 35Every author wants book reviews – they help build buzz, inform potential readers and buyers about your book and when done well, give enough information about your book to intrigue without giving away all the pertinent details. Getting ready for the review process does take some pre-planning, as we’ve previously covered in 6 Things Your Website Should Tell Book Reviewers About You (and Your Book) http://www.amarketingexpert.com/6-things-your-website-should-tell-book-reviewers-about-you-and-your-book/ and 7 Simple Steps to Getting Your Book Reviewed http://blog.marketingtipsforauthors.com/2010/10/7-simple-steps-to-getting-your-book.html.

Once you’ve built a list of reviewers to go after, it’s time to start pitching. While this may not be as difficult as achieving world peace, it’s amazing how many authors make some big mistakes at this stage, in everything from poorly written subject lines to impersonal (unimpressive) pitches to not providing the appropriate book details.

Simplicity rules: Your email subject line should be brief, yet clear. “Review request: (Name of Book/genre)” is quite effective. You don’t have room to write a novel on the subject line and you want the recipient to be clear what your email is about. This is helpful particularly if your email lands in the recipient’s spam box – a good, concise subject header makes it clear that the email is legitimate. Then, onto the pitch itself.

It’s important to realize that thousands of books are published each year so competition for reviews is fierce. The average new book, if it’s not heavily promoted by one of the major New York publishing houses, is not likely to get much in the way of reviews from newspapers and magazines. That review space has been shrinking for years, anyway. Meanwhile, there has been considerable growth in book blogging and reviewing online; but even with that growth there are still far more books being published than bloggers available to review them. Understand that most reviewers do this as a labor of love and make little to no money. Their review blogs are not full-time endeavors, but something they work into their already busy lives. Learning how to make the best first impression possible when you send that pitch is vital.

Personalize: First of all, most bloggers identify themselves somewhere on their blogs – if they don’t sign their posts with their name, the “about me” section typically lists their name or nickname. Use it! When you use a blogger’s name one thing is instantly clear: you actually took the time to find out who you’re pitching. That’s a big plus. Introduce yourself (briefly), and then don’t just ask them to review your book, give them a reason – have they reviewed other books similar to yours? Do they specialize in reviewing books in your genre?

If you’re comfortable having a little fun with your pitch, by all means do so – I once saw a pitch for a frothy romance that asked potential reviewers if they’d like to sin with a duke. Very catchy and appropriate for the book! But – don’t force it – if that’s not your personality, then don’t worry about it. It’s far more important to explain who you are, what your book is about, WHY this reviewer should be interested in your book and provide links to your website so they can follow up, learn more about your book and decide whether they’d like to request a review copy. They will follow up by clicking through on links, so make sure your website has all the necessary information about you and your book.

If you did your homework during your research phase you may know some things about this blogger that might help you get a review request. For instance, if they love a particular author and your book is in a similar vein, that’s something you can put in your pitch.

Basics count: Make sure you include all the basic book information in the email:

Title
Author
Genre
ISBN (the 13 digit ISBN of your preferred format, hardcover or paperback)
Publication Date (month, year)
Pages
Price
Publisher
And include your website link. (This should also be included on your PR, which you will send out with copies of your book).

Timeframe for replies: You may or may not hear back right away. Each blogger has a different schedule – some people check email daily, others may only check weekly. Be patient. It’s fine to follow up in a couple of weeks if you really felt you matched up with a particular blog and didn’t hear back. It’s possible your original email ended up in a spam folder or was overlooked (the sheer volume of review requests that reviewers receive is pretty staggering). After that, if there’s still no word, let it go. Seek reviews from other bloggers. If you do receive a “No thank you,” move on, it’s not an invitation to try to arm-twist the reviewer into taking on your book.

Additional pitching options: Fiction and nonfiction authors may take a different approach when pitching. For fiction, it may make sense to seek bloggers who review books in your genre; but if your fictional book covers topics that you are an expert in, you may have some other options. For instance, if you heavily researched the history of a city or a historical figure you may find bloggers who are history buffs who might be open to reviewing your book. Sometimes it helps to brainstorm a list of topics from your book, fact or fiction, in order to generate ideas of what type of publications or bloggers or reviewers you should target.

With nonfiction, you’re an expert on the topic(s) at hand and should look for your peers in those areas when seeking reviewers. It’s much more competitive in this realm, but instead of deciding not to pitch someone who could be a competitor see if there are ways for you to help each other – and use that as part of your pitch. You never know what kind of partnership you can develop if you don’t ask. Darren Rowse at ProBlogger covers this really well on his blog, and his blog is worth following. Two useful articles include:

* How to Pitch Bloggers – Make it a Win/Win/Win Situation http://www.problogger.net/archives/2010/05/28/how-to-pitch-bloggers-make-it-a-winwinwin-situation/

* How to Pitch to Bloggers – 21 Tips http://www.problogger.net/archives/2007/10/30/how-to-pitch-to-bloggers-21-tips/

* From Journalistics blog – What’s the Best Way to Pitch Bloggers? http://blog.journalistics.com/2009/whats_the_best_way_to_pitch_bloggers/

More pitching advice:

http://badpitch.blogspot.com/2007/09/ready-to-pitch-blog-take-this-quiz.html
http://www.midwestbookreview.com/bookbiz/advice/rules.htm
http://www.writing-world.com/promotion/reviews.shtml
http://www.midwestbookreview.com/bookbiz/advice/fivedead.htm

Additional information

While your PR piece is something you can send out to alert the world to your book and also post to various sites online, it is also a vital document that should be included with every review copy you send out. As a result you’ll want to be sure your PR piece – which should be two pages MAXIMUM – has your contact information (phone and email), website url, book synopsis, brief author bio and the book information you used for your pitch (the listing that includes genre, ISBN, publication date, etc.) You are dealing with very busy people who are deluged with hundreds of books a year and you want to make it as easy as possible for them to write about your book – and what’s better than having a PR piece handy with everything they could possibly need – from the book description to the about the author section, website link, book information and so forth? They’ll love you for it!

Share this article with these tweetables:

 



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – December 15, 2014
December 15, 2014by: Penny
Enter Your Mail Address:

Comments Off

Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. This week features posts on writing and getting published. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Writing

Hazel Longuet submitted Gifts for Writers and Authors posted at A Novel Experience, saying, “Perfect Christmas Gifts For Writers and Authors. Trying to find the perfect present for people can be a trial and no-one wants to waste money on an unappreciated gift. Well luckily for you I’ve done all the heavy lifting and found a range of items to help you find the perfect present for the writer in your life. They will love them – and love you for buying them.”

writer at work

book marketing tips for authors

Chrys Fey submitted Writing Tips, Part One posted at Write with Fey, saying, “Today I am highlighting 25 of my best writing tips I’ve shared on my blog over the last three years. Enjoy!”

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted 22 Cookbook and Nonfiction Publishers Accepting Unagented Manuscripts posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “Here are 22 cookbook publishers welcoming proposals from authors – no agent needed! And, as an added bonus, many of these publishers also accept nonfiction in other categories. (Remember, non-fiction publishers want proposals, not manuscripts.) Make sure to read the full submission guidelines before you submit.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of December 8, 2014
December 12, 2014by: Penny
Enter Your Mail Address:

Comments Off

Here’s a rundown of some top book marketing tweets to guide you, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include why rushing kills good books, whether hiring help or going the DIY route makes more sense for authors, working with book bloggers, and more. Happy marketing!

**************

* How Can Authors Stand Out on Social Media?

It may seem like social media consists of a lot of noise and little useful info. But you can use social media to find and grow an audience:

http://www.socialmediatoday.com/content/how-can-you-stand-out-social-media

social media networks for authors

* How Hurry Kills Good Books

There are many reasons for you to take your time writing and publishing your books. Think quality over quantity:

http://socialmediajustforwriters.com/hurry-kills-good-books/

* Self-Publishing: DIY or Hire Help?

Many writers hear that they need to hire professionals, but you can do a lot yourself – if you want to:

http://www.molly-greene.com/self-publishing-diy-or-hire-help/

* 4 Tips for Working With Book Bloggers

Bloggers can be very helpful when it comes to getting exposure for your book. Here’s how to find the right bloggers for your book:

http://writersinthestormblog.com/2014/11/4-tips-for-working-with-book-bloggers/

* Why It’s Good to Get Bad Reviews

Having a few not-so-great reviews for your book can give your book credibility:

http://www.selfpublishingadvice.org/bad-reviews/

* 12 Ways to Avoid Looking Clueless On Social Media

Get some great tips from social media expert Guy Kawasaki:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericwagner/2014/12/03/12-ways-to-avoid-looking-clueless-on-social-media/

* Email Marketing for Writers: Build Your List!

If you collect more emails, you can improve your email marketing and sell more books:

http://www.theloneliestplanet.com/2014/12/email-marketing-for-writers-build-your.html

* 11 Social Media Statistics You Should Have Known Yesterday

Did you know the most repinned images on Pinterest have multiple colors? Learn that and more:

http://sproutsocial.com/insights/social-media-statistics/



Four Tips on What NOT to Say (or Pitch or Do) to Get Your Book Reviewed: Tip #34 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
December 10, 2014by: ameeditor
Enter Your Mail Address:

1 Comment »

Welcome to Tip #34 of our 52 Ways to Sell More Books! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books.  Want the complete book of tips? Get it here!

Four Tips on What NOT to Say (or Pitch or Do) to Get Your Book Reviewed

Tip 34If you want guarantees, you won’t find them in book reviews. Death and taxes, yes – but the book review process is a sea of unknowns, from how many review requests you’ll get to who’ll actually post a review to whether they’ll even like your book at all.

When you’ve got people reviewing books mostly as a labor of love, the reality is, that review you expected this month may be delayed by a couple of months. Or, they may not love your book and be pretty blunt about it. Life happens. It’s fine to check back with a reviewer if you haven’t heard anything and had been given a review timeframe. It’s fine to correct a factual error in a review, but it’s not appropriate to start a fight with someone who has fairly reviewed your book and just decided it didn’t work for them.

What else should you keep in mind during the review process?

Be a Pro. It probably seems unnecessary to state that being professional at all times is important, but there have been so many author-initiated blog brouhahas online that we can’t take anything for granted. Ask nicely when requesting a review; be gracious if the answer is no. It’s not personal. If you’ve done your homework you may know going in that a particular blogger – who you’ve identified as a key blogger for your book – is overwhelmed with a review backlog. Perhaps the blogger is up for a guest post, and if you see the blog often includes them, be prepared to pitch some ideas. Maybe it’s a good site for contests – again, be ready to suggest a contest and terms. Pay attention to what the blogger does on his or her blog – it’s most definitely not all reviews, all the time – and see if there is anything you can contribute to either complement a review or in place of a review.

Be appreciative. I can count on both hands, with fingers left over, the number of authors we’ve worked with who have bothered to thank reviewers. Do it. The authors who do take the time to email the blogger to say thanks are usually rewarded by developing relationships with the bloggers they thank. If that blogger enjoyed the author’s book they usually ask if they can review the author’s next book, and so on. What was originally a one-time situation now becomes an ongoing relationship in which the reviewer follows the author’s career and the author has additional opportunities for book reviews, interviews and more – and not only with that blogger; chances are the blogger’s peers who like the same kind of books are going to take notice.

Never burn bridges. Even if a review you receive is unfair, or not the quality you expected, there is only so much you can do. If there is a factual error, by all means alert the blogger immediately with the correction. Otherwise, if you just don’t like the review, let it go. Just remember that whatever the review says, you never know how readers will react and I’ve seen many cases in which the lukewarm review caused others to say they wanted to read the book for themselves. You’re getting free publicity and you have to realize that everyone may take away a different perspective from one review. And you should still thank them, nicely, for taking the time to review your book.

Take the long view. Also understand that the Internet has brought together hundreds of book lovers (aka book bloggers) as never before, and not only do they share their love of books, they also discuss problems, issues and more. Angry authors have gotten plenty of bad coverage this way, with the result being that a multitude of reviewers have sworn they will never review any work by that author. Ever. There’s an adage about never getting into a fight with someone who buys ink by the barrel – a reference to newspapers and magazines – but the reality now is you don’t want to get into a fight with someone who has a blog with hundreds (or more) of followers, plus Twitter and Facebook accounts and the ability to broadcast bad news far and wide. Don’t let that be you!

Grab our free ebook

Want your own copy of our ebook?

"How To Get Published Without Getting Scammed"

It's your FOR FREE! Just enter in your email address below.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Share this article with these tweetables:





Page 5 of 98« First...34567...102030...Last »

Author Marketing Experts, Inc. - AME on Facebook