The Book Marketing Blog

by Penny Sansevieri
What the Shopping Channels Can Teach Us About Selling: Tip #44 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
February 24, 2015by: ameeditor
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Welcome to Tip #44 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books. Want the complete book of tips? Get it here!

What the Shopping Channels Can Teach Us About Selling

Tip 44Whether we admit it or not, we’ve all watched a home shopping channel, even if we just stopped by for a minute or two while channel surfing. Home shopping channels are big and the two of the biggest are HSN and QVC; together they generate a combined total of $10 billion in sales every year. They are geared to selling 24/7. What can we learn from this mode of sales? Well, actually a lot. When you break down their method of selling you’ll see quite a bit of brilliance behind the shopping channels’ strategy that can be applied to your own marketing and sales efforts.

Details, details: The first thing the host will do is give you an overview and then zero in on the details, pieces, parts and bonuses. When you’re showcasing your book or product, it’s important to not just focus on the 30,000 foot overview, but the minutiae as well. The caveat is: it has to be exciting to your consumer. The idea is to push the product, then entice them with the details. How will you do this? Start with one, big, overarching question or pitch. Let’s say you wrote a book on dieting, you might say: “If you’re ready to finally lose those extra 30 pounds for good, this is the last diet book you’ll ever need to read.” Now, that’s a pretty big statement, and you’ll need to follow it up with some details that help build your case. See what I mean? If the book has recipes, highlight several and talk about them. If the book has some never-before-revealed secrets, highlight those too and make sure your consumer knows the whole package they’re getting, not just the idea.

Repetition: If you’ve ever watched HSN or QVC you know that their specials are repeated over and over and over again. Telling your consumer once won’t cut it, but telling them twice generally won’t either. You have to tell people again and again and again. Think about it: How many times are you telling folks about your book? How can you adapt this to book marketing? Think about the different ways you reach out to your consumer. How many times are you mentioning your book? If the answer to that is “I don’t know,” then you might want to rethink your marketing strategy. Now, I’m not saying that every Tweet and Facebook update needs to have your book title it in, but what I am saying is that if you are doing any kind of target marketing, email, or mailing, you need to make sure that you continue to push the message of your book for as long as you are marketing it.

Results: What will this book do for your reader? If it was featured on the Home Shopping Network you can be sure you would know, and it would be explained to you in Technicolor detail. Often, they will demo the product on the air. Why do they do this? Because the before and after is wildly popular with consumers. Now, if you’re not on HSN, how will you demo this? For starters, you can get testimonials for your website. Remember: what someone else says about your book, message, or product is 1,000 times more effective than anything you can say. You can also consider a YouTube channel (think of it as your very own HSN) and get video testimonials, or demo the ideas in your book. If you’re marketing a product, demo the product on video. Remember we love to know it’ll do XYZ for us, but seeing it is 1,000 times more powerful than just hearing it.

How’s it selling? It never fails: during the broadcast, the host will always tell you how well the product is selling. In fact, often they will tell you that it’s nearly selling out, thereby heightening the urgency to buy. As part of your book marketing have you pushed your updates to your audience? Have you told them how well it’s selling? Share stats with them, social proof, and popularity. Remember, people like what other people like. If a lot of other people like your book or product, tell your new consumers. It will help heighten their excitement.

Packaging, bonuses and oh, wait, there’s more! The beauty of this last line (as hokey as it might sound) is that it keeps the consumer on edge and ready to dial, but there’s more… so the additional bonuses entice them further. When we offered my book, Red Hot Internet Publicity, packaged for a limited time with another title (the offer was “Get 2 books for the price of 1”) we tripled our sales. Packages and special offers work, though it’s generally a good idea to offer them for a limited time. As you’ll see from one of the points below, urgency sells.

Pricing: Consumers love a bargain and the Home Shopping Network knows this all too well, so the discounts are crucial if they are trying to sell out a product. If you are trying to push your book, don’t get greedy. As I mentioned in the point above, the deeper the discount, the better the response. Be clear on your price point, i.e. what you need to make a profit, then play with the numbers and see what your consumer responds to. Now, you don’t have to offer shippable product as a special offer or price enhancement; it can also be electronic which makes it easier and raises your profit margin.

Urgency: Let’s face it, while it might seem cheesy, urgency sells. “Only 10 minutes left to buy!” and suddenly the phones light up. During the process of the sale, sale updates, bonuses, discounts, etc. all help to heighten the urgency of the buy including the limited time offer. When you’re running a special promotion, the best way to get people to beat a path to your door is to give them a deadline.

Remember the upsell: When you’ve got someone’s attention, why not try and sell them more? If you have bundled product, or special additions to your product, be sure and mention it. In fact, one of the most effective ways to generate sales is to entice your consumer by offering bonuses. Keep in mind that the bonuses need to have value to the consumer: they must enhance your product, not detract from it. You likely wouldn’t offer a copy of a colleague’s fiction book if you are selling a book on building your business. You might want to sell something a bit more compatible like a handbook, white paper, or webinar (either pre-recorded or live). Upsells are great when the product pairing is complimentary.

If you’re not convinced by these tips, try watching a shopping channel and see if you don’t agree. Their methods of selling are so finely tuned, you’ll see a real pattern in how they present each and every product. What that says is: if it works, stick with it. Try one or all of the above insights and see if it doesn’t tip the selling scale in your favor.

Good luck!

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Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of February 16, 2015
February 21, 2015by: Penny
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Get some marketing mojo from these book promotion and publishing industry tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include choosing Kindle keywords, finding revenue streams, using Amazon reviews to sell more books, and more. Happy marketing!

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* Authorpreneurship: To Succeed, Authors Must Be More Businesslike Than Ever

What does this entail? Authors need to think strategically about their brand and how to market themselves and their books:

http://www.economist.com/news/business/21643124-succeed-these-days-authors-must-be-more-businesslike-ever-authorpreneurship

Online Shopping Concept. Shopping Cart With Boxes Over Laptop

* 33 Revenue Streams For Authors – Even If You Write Non-Fiction

This fabulous list from Joan Stewart offers an amazing range of ideas, from special reports, tips booklets, cruise ship workshops, board games and more:

http://thefutureofink.com/33-revenue-streams-for-authors/

* Top 5 Ways Authors Can Promote and Sell More Books

Spread your message through your local market, for instance:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dorit-sasson/top-five-ways-authors-can_b_6665110.html

* How to Choose Kindle Keywords

When you select the right words for your book you increase the chances for your book to be discovered:

http://www.selfpublishingreview.com/2015/02/how-to-choose-kindle-keywords/

* Are Novellas the Future of Publishing?

Publisher Tor.com believes so, and they’re focused on creating short reads that people can fit into their hectic daily lives:

http://io9.com/tor-com-explains-why-novellas-are-the-future-of-publish-1685440234

* 6 Trend-Savvy Book Publishing Strategies

With all the competition out there, you want your book to stand out from the crowd. These tips will help:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-tener/6-trendsavvy-book-publish_b_6658134.html

* 53+ Free Image Sources for Your Blog and Social Media Posts

Stumped for good images you can use? This list will give you plenty of options:

https://blog.bufferapp.com/free-image-sources-list

* Amazon Reviews: How Readers Look at Them, and How to Sell Using Them

Learn how you can use your book reviews to generate more sales:

http://www.selfpublishingreview.com/2015/02/how-readers-look-at-amazon-book-pages/



Ten Reasons Why You Should be Blogging: Tip #43 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
February 18, 2015by: ameeditor
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Welcome to Tip #43 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books.  So, ready? Here we go!

Tip 43Ten Reasons Why You Should be Blogging

With all the Tweeting, Facebook Liking, and LinkedIn connecting going on, it’s easy to forget about blogging and finding the time to do so. Blogging, however, can be extremely useful for more reasons than just populating your website with content (although that’s important too). Let’s look at some reasons why you must blog and why it should matter to you!

Blogging gives “voice” to a website: In an age where there are millions of websites and millions more coming online each month, how can you stand apart from the crowd? One way is to get a great-looking site, but as we all know, sometimes budgets allow just the basics. A blog can then step in and (through your voice) give content and character to any website, regardless of how fancy or plain it might be. In fact, some of the best blogs have carried the success of many a less-than-spectacular website.

Content marketing: We all know that we need to create content and lots of it, but who has the time? Well, now you can use your blog as a content creating machine. You can develop original content there and push it out to different areas. For example, I will sometimes use my blog posts for Twitter updates, Facebook updates, and article syndication.

Search engine candy: Blogs are great optimization tools. Search engines (especially Google) love sites that are updated frequently. One easy and quick way to do that is via a blog. Each time you update your blog it pings the search engines and tells them the content on your site has been updated.

Social media must: If you’re going to tweet, or want to be liked on Facebook, there’s no two ways about it, you must have a blog. That’s the site you send them to for your complete content, where they can comment, become a follower and help you grow your tribe.

Blogger friendly: If you’re going to pitch bloggers, you must first have a blog. Love bloggers? Be a blogger first. Similar to the step above, you can become active on other blogs, commenting and sharing ideas, and attract them back to yours where they can return the favor. By the time you pitch them, you’re not just another email in an inbox, you’re someone they know and like.

Be an industry leader: It’s hard to be a leader in the industry if you don’t have a voice. A blog can give you a voice. Also, by blogging on your market, you can stay in touch with your market and hot topics much easier. Stay dialed in, stay current: a blog can help you do that.

Media, speaking: I’ve gotten media interviews and speaking gigs from my blog. If you blog enough and on interesting, relevant issues, you can gain some serious momentum for not only your website, but your career as well.

The competitive edge: No matter what category you publish under, there is always a lot of competition. Yes, you can compete with a better cover, a better book, but on your website a blog will help define you as the author in a unique way that a book category can’t. When you’re in a cluttered market, like dating, dieting, or finance, a blog can really help to define and refine your message.

Credibility: Blogs are great credibility builders. Getting on topic and giving your opinion (and yes, being different) can really help to build your footing and credibility in the marketplace.

Site traffic/SEO: Aside from what a blog can do for your site as it relates to Google, an active blog can also help to increase site traffic and help further optimize the site. It’s a fantastic tool for getting your site better links, traffic, and a higher ranking in search engines.

So now that I’ve convinced you to blog, I want to refer you to another piece I’ve written on blogging called “How to Become a Powerhouse Blogger in 15 Minutes”  I hope that this piece, along with the tips provided above, will help you launch or reinvigorate your blogging campaign.

Good luck and Happy Blogging!

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AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – February 16, 2015
February 16, 2015by: Penny
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Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. This edition features posts on book marketing, getting published, writing, and book sales. Thank you to all of our contributors.

Writing

Hazel Longuet submitted 20 Writing Tips: This Week’s Most Popular Articles On Writing posted at A Novel Experience, saying, “Here are top 20 articles that got most traction from my social media followers last week. They cover the whole gamut (writing, self-publishing, book promotion, author platforms, social media). A collection of great articles from great authors.”

writing working on laptop keyboard

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted 23 Poetry Publishers Accepting Unagented Manuscripts posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “This list consists of publishers that do not charge a fee or require an agent, and which offer royalties, however modest. All of them publish book-length collections and/or chapbooks.”

Book Marketing

Iola Goulton submitted Introducing NetGalley posted at Australasian Christian Writers, saying, “What is NetGalley, and how does it work (for writers and reviewers)?”

Book Sales

Sarah Bolme submitted The State of Fiction Reading posted at Marketing Christian Books saying, “Is fiction reading on the decline? If so, what does this mean for book sales?”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of February 9, 2015
February 14, 2015by: Penny
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We’ve got some great tips for you from these book marketing and publishing industry tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include getting more out of Twitter, keeping inspired to write, handling bad book reviews, and more. Happy marketing!

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* Be Traditionally Published or be Damned?

Being a self-published author means you’ve survived the gauntlet of publishing to get your book out to the world:

http://nadinematheson.com/2015/01/27/be-traditionally-publish-or-be-damned/

* How to Handle Bad Book Reviews

For starters, develop a thick skin or just don’t read reviews of your book:

http://jodyhedlund.blogspot.com/2015/01/how-to-handle-bad-book-reviews.html

book review word cloud

* 10 Things to Say to a Writer Who’s on the Ledge

If things don’t look so good, here are some things to remember to put it into perspective:

http://www.novelrocket.com/2015/02/10-things-to-say-to-writer-whos-on-ledge.html

* The Ebook is Not Dead

Don’t believe the hype, the statistics prove that ebooks are alive and doing well:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/feb/01/the-ebook-is-dead-long-live-print-digital-sales

* 8 Compelling Ways to Tell 140 Character Stories On Twitter

Discover the elements of a great tweet:

http://www.jeffbullas.com/2015/01/24/8-compelling-ways-to-tell-140-character-stories-on-twitter/

* Judging a Book by Its Cover: What Publicists & Media Want to See on the Outside of a Book

This book cover checklist will ensure you produce the best cover for your book:

http://blog.bookbaby.com/2015/02/judging-book-cover-book-publicists-media-want-see-outside-book/

* 3 Common Mistakes Authors Make With Amazon Book Listings (and how to fix them!)

Is your Amazon listing doing everything possible to make your book appealing to readers?

http://www.powerupforprofits.com/2015/02/authors-amazon.html

* 53+ Free Image Sources for Your Blog and Social Media Posts

Images are important, and this list of resources will help your graphics stand out wherever you use them:

https://blog.bufferapp.com/free-image-sources-list



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – February 9, 2015
February 9, 2015by: Penny
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Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. We thank this week’s contributors for their pieces on writing, getting published, book marketing, self-publishing, and social media.

Self-Publishing

Hazel Longuet submitted 20 Writing Tips: This Week’s Most Popular Articles On Writing posted at Novel Experience, saying, “Every Monday I do a round-up of the previous week’s top 20 articles on writing, self-publishing and book promotion as buzzed up by the actions of my 7k social media followers – comprising of primarily published and aspiring authors. So here are this week’s top 20…..”

Success Tools Toolbox Succeeding Goal Skills

Social Media

Chrys Fey submitted How to Create an Author Facebook Page posted at Write With Fey, saying, “Creating a Facebook Page is a big step, because it says you’re ready to get more readers and engage with them.”

Book Marketing

Mayowa Ajisafe submitted How To Get The Best Cover Design And Use Your Cover Design To Market Your Book, Build A Side Author Business And Sell More Books With Derek Murphy posted at Authors Crib, saying, “In this episode of Authors Crib Podcast, I had a chat with Derek Murphy of The Creativ Indie and DIY Book Covers who is an author and a book cover design expert who has designed tons of book covers for bestselling authors like Joanna Penn of TheCreativePenn.com. Derek shares his writing journey and discusses how he started working with authors as an editor and cover designer and offers tons of great cover design and book marketing tips, strategies and advice as well as his best tips on how authors can build a side business as an author to augment their writing income.”

Writing

David Leonhardt submitted Who Hires a Ghostwriter posted at The Happy Guy Writing Services, saying, “Everybody knows that some people hire ghostwriters. But it might surprise you to discover who some of those ‘some people’ are.”

Getting Published

Katie McCoach submitted What NOT to Say to a Literary Agent (or Editor) posted at KM Editorial, saying, “After attending an event hosted by GLAWS, KM Editorial shares the takeaways on what NOT to say to a literary agent (or editor) to sell your book.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of February 2, 2015
February 7, 2015by: Penny
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Get some ideas and inspiration from these book marketing and publishing industry tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include whether social media is worth a writer’s time, how to use Thunderclap to promote your book, a guide to advertising on Amazon, and more. Happy marketing!

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* How to Win Sales And Influence Amazon’s Algorithms

A great discussion between two authors who have found creative ways to share their audiences and boost their sales:

https://davidgaughran.wordpress.com/2015/01/31/how-to-win-sales-and-influence-algorithms/

* Tips for Gaining Attention in the World of Fiction

Here are some things you can do to get your book noticed:

http://www.writersandauthors.info/2014/12/tips-for-gaining-attention-in-world-of.html

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* Free Publicity for Your KDP Select Free Days

If you’re going to offer your ebook for free, you need to promote it. This list will give you a lot of options for free and paid sites as well as Facebook groups you can use to get the word out:

http://publishedtodeath.blogspot.com/2013/08/how-to-get-free-promotion-for-your.html

* How You Can Use Thunderclap to Promote Your Book

Thunderclap allows authors to build a book launch team, promote a sample chapter, share a book promotion, and more:

http://thefutureofink.com/thunderclap/

* How to Advertise on Amazon: A Step-by-Step Tutorial

Now that authors who use KDP Select can advertise on Amazon, the question is: how does it work? Author Nicholas Rossis explains:

http://nicholasrossis.me/2015/02/01/advertise-with-amazon-a-step-by-step-tutorial/

* 21 Free Resources for Authors

You’ll find a range of freebies here, and something is bound to be useful!

http://buildbookbuzz.com/21-free-resources-for-authors/

* The Finances of Publishing

How indie authors can set a realistic budget to get their book published, from book covers to editing to ebook and print formatting and more:

http://www.novelpublicity.com/2015/01/money-money-money-the-finances-of-publishing/

* Do Writers REALLY Need to Use Social Media Anymore?

Authors already have plenty to do – is social media just a time suck?

http://jodyhedlund.blogspot.com/2015/02/do-writers-really-need-to-use-social.html



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of January 26, 2015
January 31, 2015by: Penny
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Get some useful tips from these book marketing and publishing industry tweets to guide you, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include planning a successful book event, setting writing goals, dealing with plagiarized articles, and more. Happy marketing!

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* 5 Ways to Sell More Books on Amazon

These tips include ideas you may not have tried – such as having buyers of your book on Amazon buy books in the same basket. Here’s why that works:

http://www.selfpublishingreview.com/2015/01/five-ways-to-sell-more-books-on-amazon/

* 39 Ways to Get More Social Media Followers

These tips will help you connect with the right people, and not only grow your following, but maintain it:

http://www.inc.com/jayson-demers/39-ways-to-get-more-social-media-followers.html

when-someone-steals-A-012222015-blog_pin-200x300

* What to do When Someone Steals Your Stuff

If you find your blog post showing up on another site, and not credited to you, this is what you need to do:

http://www.amarketingexpert.com/someone-steals-stuff/

* Most Indie Authors Make Less Than $1K a Year

Interesting survey results show how tough it is to be an author. Yet indie authors, regardless of earnings, report higher levels of satisfaction:

http://www.adweek.com/galleycat/indie-authors-make-about-500-a-year/98099

* How to Set Writing Goals in Six Easy Steps

This guide will help you focus on why you write, and how much time you have, so you’ll get results:

http://thefutureofink.com/how-to-set-writing-goals/

* Twitter Advanced Search: The Ultimate Guide

Discover how to use Twitter to listen in to conversations online to gather valuable information on competitors, your industry, and more:

http://www.razorsocial.com/twitter-advanced-search/

* Is Your Amazon Author Page a Dead-End?

This free resource is underutilized by most authors, and yet it’s a great promotional tool when used properly:

http://authors.choosybookworm.com/is-your-amazon-author-page-a-dead-end/

* 5 Things to do Before Your Next Book Event

If you hope for a successful event that attracts attendees, these tips will help!

http://www.nessgraphica.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-next-book-event/



The New Kindle Singles and How it Can Benefit Your Book
January 29, 2015by: ameeditor
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POSTED Kindle Singles 01292015 - blog_pinBlogs have started incorporating “reading time” plugins into their posts. If the post takes five minutes or ten minutes, it’s often displayed on the blog post. Makes it pretty simple to know, going into it, how much time you should allocate to read a certain post.

Now, it seems, Amazon is doing the same thing. There have been some changes to Kindle Singles, and if you haven’t checked this out you should, because the added exposure could really benefit your book if it meets this criteria.

Here is a redesign of the Amazon Kindle Singles page. Now their short books are being identified by the time it takes to read them: 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and so on. Take a look:

 

 

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Per Amazon, you can propose books that are current on the Amazon site or you can pitch them an idea. But if you have a book that fits their guidelines (listed below), it could be a great way to gain some additional exposure because, from what I hear, the singles and short reads are gaining a lot of traction, especially with recent site enhancements like this:

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Here is what I got from Amazon related to short reads and singles:

You may propose any content you own the digital rights to for consideration as a Kindle Single. We consider books recently published via Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP), manuscripts or pitches. To nominate your self-published book, send us the title, ASIN, and a brief summary of your work. If it’s not yet published in the Kindle Store, please provide either a manuscript or pitch and a writing sample. All manuscripts submitted as attachments must be accompanied by a cover letter with a detailed summary of the submission.

To qualify, works must have a word count between 5,000 and 30,000 words. At this time, the following works are not being considered for Kindle Singles: how-to manuals, public domain works, reference books, travel guides, short story collections, and children’s books. Complete guidelines can be found at www.amazon.com/singlessubmissions

Please send your submission details to kindle-singles@amazon.com. Your proposal will be reviewed within 6 weeks, and you will be notified by email about our decision.

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Amazon Hack: Get Your Book into the Hands of an International Audience: Tip #40 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
January 28, 2015by: ameeditor
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Welcome to Tip #40 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books.  So, ready? Here we go!

Amazon Hack: Get Your Book into the Hands of an International Audience

The international book buying market is really growing. Are you taking advantage of it? If you’re not, you should be, and here’s a quick how-to to guide you and your book into more foreign sales. Theoretically, connecting all of your books to all of your Author Central Pages should bring you more visibility and more exposure in a variety of markets, not just in the US.

Not familiar with Amazon Author Central? If you’re not, go here and familiarize yourself with it first: www.authorcentral.amazon.com – it will take you through a quick sign-up process and you can claim all your books, and add content to your author page. It’s easy to do and having access to that Author Central page can really help you promote your book and also keep closer track of your sales on Amazon.

So let’s move to the international market. First, just about each country that Amazon has a footprint in will have an Author Central Page that you’ll need to gain access to. I’ve listed the international sites below so you can just click on them and start getting yourself into those markets. Right now, I want to walk you through what to expect when you do this.

Let’s say you decide to head over to France first. Bonjour Paris! The European set-up process is slightly different from the US, so let’s take you through it.

Here’s what you’ll get when you go to the Amazon Author Central link at their French site. It will ask you for your username and password. The good news is these are universal so you can use them at any of their sites (smart, Amazon). You’ll log in here:

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Once you log in, it will take you to this page, which asks to you to confirm this is where you intended to go:

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Then you’ll be asked to accept the Author Central Terms of Service agreement (I’ve been told it’s identical to the US version)

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Approving this will send you the identity confirmation page:

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Then, unlike the US system, it will ask you to confirm your books before sending you to another email confirmation page. I used a screenshot here from an author we are working with. They want to confirm these are your books so click the orange button and make sure that you don’t leave the “All formats” but rather pick the English only. Though this is all in a foreign language many browsers have a translation extension, if they don’t you can probably easily spot the word “English” from the two options.

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Once you complete this, it will take you to the email confirmation page:

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And you’ll want to check your email and your Spam because Amazon won’t let you in until you confirm your email address. The email will look like this:

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After clicking that you’re set – you’ll just need to start adding your books. Remember that if your books aren’t translated you’ll want to be sure and pick the English version, otherwise the system will never find it to add it to your profile. See this screenshot:

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Do you see the box that says Suche in front of it? That’s where you will identify the edition you want to pull. It should always say English.

One thing that I found helpful was keeping my US Author Central profile up the entire time because though the pages are in another language, the information is identical so if you can’t figure it out (and your browser won’t translate), check your US page to be sure. You can add almost the same information that you can on your US page. There are a few exceptions. For example, it won’t let you add your blog feed, but I suspect that Amazon will add that at some point.

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Now, much like your US Author Central page (screenshot above) you can also grab your Twitter feed, add videos, a bio, etc. You can really enhance this page and you should. Add endorsements, reviews, etc. Whatever you have on your US page should be mirrored on all of these international pages. The final page will look like this:

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Now if you think you need to create one for every country don’t worry about that just yet. Amazon isn’t everywhere and some of the countries do not have Author Central areas set up yet. Below are links to the various pages that you can set up as well as a link to all of the Amazon stores internationally. You should complete the ones you can now and keep an eye on this for later!

France: https://authorcentral.amazon.fr/gp/landing/278-9618540-8642433?ie=UTF8&*Version*=1&*entries*=0

Germany: https://authorcentral.amazon.de/

Japan: https://authorcentral.amazon.co.jp/

United Kingdom: https://authorcentral.amazon.co.uk/

Amazon’s International stores: https://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?docId=487250

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