Book Marketing Blogs

by Penny Sansevieri
Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of April 2, 2012
April 6, 2012by: Paula
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Enjoy a collection of some of the best book marketing Tweets from the past week, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include maximizing your LinkedIn profile, getting bookstores to carry indie books, promoting an author’s books on Pinterest, improving your ebook sales, and much more. Happy marketing!

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* How Authors Promote Each Other’s Books on Pinterest

It never hurts to help your friends, especially if they are authors. Here’s how you can use Pinterest to promote friends’ books:

http://publicityhound.net/how-authors-promote-each-others-books-on-pinterest/

* How To Pitch Your Book to Online Outlets

Email client software screenshot

One author explains how he got some great online coverage when he was promoting his book:

http://workflowwriting.com/659259/how-to-pitch-your-book-to-online-outlets.php (more…)



Indie Books and Bookstores…
April 4, 2012by: Paula
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Guest post by Steve Moore:

Recently an edition of the NY Times featured an article on Barnes & Noble bookstores in the business section.  A summary of the article:  B&N thinks that it’s doing everything it can to survive.  My observation:  No, there are things it could do but doesn’t want to do.  Since we are in the middle of a paradigm shift in the publishing world, I wouldn’t dare make predictions on how eBooks and indie publishing are going to affect legacy publishers.  I can warn them to look out, though.  I remember opting for betamax because it was technically the best option, but VHS won the day (and now, no one uses either one!).  Predicting the fickle fate of modern technologies is best left for people that don’t eat enough protein and can use the egg on their face.

Barnes & Noble nook (ebook reader device)

So, what things would I do if I were B&N?  (I’ll ask the same question of small mom and pop bookstores below.)  First, I’d bring out a competitor to the Kindle.  Check that off.  I don’t like the Nook, but I know people who do.  When I say Kindle, I’m referring to the e-ink low glare screen version I have, the one where you can only read books and newspapers.  The Fire is a Nook is an iPad-I don’t like any of them because I’m not an apps-icon pusher.  Apps are baby computer programs, the computer version of drug addiction.  I get along just fine without them and probably always will. (more…)



Publishing Insiders Wrap-Up: Special Guest Arielle Ford
February 22, 2012by: Paula
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We had a great show with Arielle Ford, author and publicist, who discussed her latest book as well as what she did to market this book (compared to past books).

The show opened with some industry news from hosts Penny Sansevieri and Paula Krapf.

A lot of publishing news these days is tied to the letter “A” for Amazon. On Feb. 13, author J.A. Konrath wrote a post titled “Amazon Will Destroy You” for his blog, A Newbie’s Guide to Publishing. He noted that Amazon is focused on the future – 2018 to be exact. Meanwhile, in his opinion, the New York publishing industry has not changed and is not competitive. Konrath feels the traditional publishing industry has been too slow – too slow to adapt to the Internet, to sell books through their sites, etc. He concluded: “Amazon is going to destroy the Big 6, destroy bookstores, destroy 95% of all agents, destroy distributors (Ingram, Baker & Taylor), and revolutionize the publishing industry by becoming the dominant force.” You can read the entire blog post here: (more…)



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of January 23, 2012
January 27, 2012by: Paula
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Enjoy some of the most informative book marketing Tweets from the past week, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include the best time to post content, how to increase your book’s Amazon rank, Facebook marketing tips, and much more. Happy marketing!

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* The New Author Pitch: Show, Don’t Sell

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A word cloud of the content of the word cloud ...
Learn how to use the right words to get noticed by the various audiences you want to reach:

http://www.alanrinzler.com/blog/2012/01/16/the-new-author-pitch-show-don%E2%80%99t-sell/ (more…)



Publishing Insiders Wrap-Up: Facebook Facts from Social Media Expert Mari Smith
January 11, 2012by: Paula
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We had a great show on relationship marketing with expert Mari Smith, author of The New Relationship Marketing.

About our guest: Mari Smith is a social media expert and trainer who is considered the queen of Facebook. She was dubbed “the Pied Piper of the Online World” by Fastcompany.com. http://www.marismith.com/books/

People have always done business with people they know, like, and trust. That’s what relationship marketing is all about. In today’s world, thanks to social networking online, there are new, more direct ways of connecting with potential fans, buyers, associates, etc. Mari explains how it all works.

* Traditional marketing focuses on the transaction and closing the sale.

* Relationship marketing focuses on building long-term relationships with customers and clients. Social media makes this kind of relationship building easier than ever.

For example, Facebook has reduced the six degrees of separation to four, Mari says.

That means if you really want to go after specific influencers or potential clients you can court them via social media. You will find all manner of information on them. Do your homework and come into the relationship demonstrating that you care, that you know something about them. (more…)



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of May 23, 2011
May 27, 2011by: Paula
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We’ve rounded up a few of the top book marketing Tweets during the past week, from bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include building an online presence to sell books, promoting your articles with social media, creating a great bio and keeping track of the top publishing trends – and much more. Happy marketing!

* Marketing Your eBook as an Audiobook

An audio cassette recording

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When it comes to your eBook, consider it one of your marketing techniques and offer it in audio format to reach an even larger audience:

http://www.famousbloggers.net/marketing-ebook-audiobook.html (more…)



But, can you get me on Oprah?
May 26, 2011by: Penny
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Today at #BEA11, a bunch of folks gathered round a wide-screen TV to watch the final Oprah show. The event was hosted by a publisher who provided champagne, chocolate and mini-cupcakes. At the end of a long day at BEA, it was a welcome treat. There was quite a crowd gathered round the TV, and as Oprah walked on the screen, the group fell silent. The TV audience stood up and applauded and behind me I heard a woman whisper “Thank God I’ll never again have to hear ‘but can you get me on Oprah?’” (more…)



Armchair BEA, Day 2 Giveaways Galore and Best of 2011
May 24, 2011by: Paula
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I had fun on Day 1 checking out book blogs, getting reacquainted with some bloggers and meeting some new people, too.

Have you checked out the giveaways for participating bloggers this year? AME is one of the sponsors, and we’re giving away a Kindle: http://www.armchairbea.com/p/giveaways.html. There are tons of books and other goodies that will be given away this week. Individual bloggers are also conducting some of their own giveaways, and you can find them on Twitter by using the #ArmchairBEA hashtag. (more…)



Welcome to Armchair BEA!
May 23, 2011by: Paula
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This is a huge week in the publishing world: Book Expo America. Some of our AME team is in NYC this week where they will meet with publishers, authors and others in the industry. We’ll have plenty of information this week about what’s going on in NYC and online.

For those of us who haven’t hit the road, including yours truly, Armchair BEA is a way for bloggers, particularly book bloggers, to connect online, http://www.armchairbea.com/2011/05/kicking-off-armchair-bea.html . We’ll participate via our blog this week, and on Wednesday we will have a guest post from book blogger Heather at Capricious Reader http://www.capriciousreader.com/. We look forward to having Heather guest post on our blog, and I’m sure she’ll have some great advice for authors! That same day, an interview I did with Star Shadow blog will appear,  http://www.starshadowblog.com/. We encourage you to visit the Armchair BEA website to check out the list of participating bloggers and learn more about this vital piece of the online book world. (more…)



Fans, Friends, and Followers: How to Build a Solid Author Platform That Sells More Books!
February 7, 2011by: Penny
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Part 1: What is a Platform and How Can You Identify it?

Who Needs Customers When You Have Fans

Image by Intersection Consulting via Flickr

There’s a lot of information out there on the “how” of social media: How to set up a Twitter account, how to tweet, how to build a fan page, etc. But there isn’t a lot of information on why you’d want to use social media. You might say, “Well, everyone is doing it and having great success!” I would observe that not everyone is having great success; in fact, many authors I speak to are still trying to find their way online.

One thing that I’ve noticed when it comes to social media is that most of the time we think that it’s ok to just jump in, and that’s true — up to a point. You’d never think of driving from San Diego to New York without a roadmap or GPS, so why would you endeavor to promote yourself online without first mapping out a strategy and surveying the terrain?

Why does any of this matter? Well, I will tell you that the more work you do in preparation for your campaign, the less of an effort it will seem once you get started. Also, the more work you do now can and should save you considerable wasted expense later. You will know exactly where to spend your time and money and you will have a campaign that will not only feel seamless, but also move more quickly towards your success. Sound good? Then let’s begin!

Kommunikationstrends 2010

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Getting Started

One of the first things you’ll want to do when you start down this path of social media promotion is ask yourself: Why am I doing this? Well, you might say, to promote myself. Exactly! But (other than book sales), what is the motivation behind that promotion? The reason I say “other than book sales” is because you must have a broader scope to your work than just selling a book. If your single focus in promotion is to sell a book, you will be sorely disappointed. Your focus must be larger, such as:

• Expanding my business
• Increasing my speaking gigs
• Growing my platform

Then you’ll have a much better chance of success online and you’ll be ready to dig into online promotion. Let’s first look at growing your platform.

Indoor Swimming Pool with Diving Platform and ...

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What’s your platform?

Before we can launch into what your platform is, you must first have a good grasp of what a platform is. A platform is not who you know, but who knows you. It’s your area of influence. Still unclear on this concept? Take heart, most authors leap into marketing without knowing what a platform is or how to grow it. First, let’s look at what might be considered to be a platform:

1. Your business: this is pretty obvious. You have a business and your business is your platform. Your reach and your influence are through your customers.

2. Your speaking: any speaking you do, whether paid or unpaid, is considered a platform.

3. Newsletter subscribers: these are people who want to know what you’re doing; they are your tribe and also part of your platform.

4. Existing fan bases: any connections, whether through speaking, your newsletter, or any other fan base can be considered part of your platform.

5. Associations/groups: do you belong to any type of related association? These people and this affiliation can also be part of your platform. Though perhaps less direct and immediate, I’ll walk you through how to solidify these contacts and bring them into your funnel.

6. Work you’ve done in the past: anything related to what you’ve written about now is part of your platform. Teaching, classes you’ve taken, speaking, or just life experiences as it relates to your topic can also be woven into your platform.

Follow me on Twitter logo

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Identifying your platform

For non-fiction authors, the goal of identifying a platform you either have or wish to grow is pretty easy. But for fiction authors it can be a bit more challenging. Yes, you too must have a platform and generally, it is tied closely to your genre.

Every author, whether fiction or non-fiction needs a reach, and once you define where these folks are and how to get to them, you’ll begin to connect with readers both current and future, who can help you to expand your tribe. First, let’s look at defining those readers.

Tough guy reading danielle steele on the metro

Image by Angela Tchou via Flickr

Let’s say you’ve written a fiction book and you are new to the industry and perplexed as to how you might go about expanding your readership. I suggest if this is you that you find other, similar authors in your market and research them online. Becoming your own detective is really the quickest way to piece together a platform and learn how their platform might help you build yours. For example, if you have written romance you can research the top 15 authors in your market. If you do this, I suggest looking at the midlist authors, not the top sellers like Danielle Steele, etc. who, through years of publishing, have grandfathered themselves into a mega-platform. Instead you want to look at authors who are likely on their own, meaning without the resources of a personal assistant or staff of a thousand. Research these authors and see where they end up online. Do they have Fan Pages on Facebook? Are they on Twitter? What groups do they participate in, etc.? Now you’ll start to get a sense of how a platform is built and what you need to do to grow yours.

If you’ve written non-fiction and the idea of a platform seems foreign to you then I suggest that you do the same thing, Follow your market, research others who share your specialty and uncover the different ways that they expand their reach via their platform.

Next time, we’re going to dig into your platform even further. We’ll look at the steps necessary to grow a platform and how to break this down into a manageable action plan.

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