Book Marketing Blogs

by Penny Sansevieri
Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of May 5, 2014
May 9, 2014by: Paula
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freeLet’s look at some top topics in book marketing tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The subjects include selling more Kindle books, writing a memoir that sells, harnessing free as a marketing tool, and more. Happy marketing!

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* The Best (and Worst) Times to Post on Social Media

If you want to reach the most people when you tweet, pin, post to Facebook, etc. learn the best times to post on various networks:

http://bit.ly/1njKlGF

* Why Free is Your Best Marketing Tool and How To Harness it

Sure, there are people who’ll take anything that’s free and then forget about it. But freebie marketing can also help you build a loyal, dedicated fanbase:

http://goo.gl/xhpxAv

* 3 Habits That Separate Good Writers from Tragic Wannabes

First, learn how to become a better writer with these three essential steps:

http://bit.ly/1iUnnqk

* 5 Ways to Sell More Kindle Books

You have to do more than put your book up for sale and offer a low price. Learn how keywords, Amazon’s suggestions, and competitors can help you position your book:

http://bit.ly/1otL88a

* 10 Tips for Writing a Memoir That Sells

Memoir master class teacher Damian Barr offers some lessons:

http://huff.to/1kQri66

* New Authors: Should You Offer Free Books?

This author believes your time is best spent developing true relationships with readers to build a readership/mailing list that will help you succeed:

http://ow.ly/wz3V5

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52 Ways to Market Your Book: Tip #3 – Five Simple Ways to Grow your Email List
May 6, 2014by: Penny
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Welcome to Tip #3 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books.  So, ready? Here we go!

3Five Simple Ways to Grow your Email List

If you have an email list or are thinking of starting one, congratulations! There’s no quicker way to build your customer base than through an email list. But starting and growing one can be tricky. Here are five tips that should help you not only get subscribers, but keep them as well.

1) What’s your ethical bribe? You must have a sign up bonus or ethical bribe to get folks to leave their email address. Sure you’ll get some people who are ready to sign up for anything but it’s not likely that those people will buy anything from you. The tougher it is to convince them to leave their email address, the better suited they are to your customer base.

2) Don’t hide your sign up form. Many times web sites will have sign ups at the bottom of the homepage, which users generally won’t find. If your sign up isn’t clear, and one of the first things surfers see when they land on your page, it needs to be.

3) Be careful what you ask for. Asking for too much personal data can be crippling to a sign up list. Generally I’ll recommend that people ask for an email and first and last name (in case your email program can customize each newsletter with the subscribers first name). Otherwise leave the extensive data gathering for another time. The quickest way to lose subscribers is to ask them for information they’re not comfortable giving.

4) Overpromise & overdeliver. If you’re going to do this, do it right. Don’t gather email addresses only to offer something of minimal value in the way of a newsletter. Make sure your readers know exactly what they’ll be getting, in fact, why not offer to let them scan some back issues so they know right up front what to expect. If you overpromise and underdeliver, you’ll not only lose subscribers, but valuable readers as well.

5) Say please, say thank you. You’ve already said “please” with your ethical bribe, now make sure you say thank you for signing up with a robust sign up page. Depending on what your goals are for this newsletter your sign up page can reflect this. Perhaps your book cover or some other information? While you don’t want to overwhelm folks, a blank sign up page is a little lackluster in its delivery and should be avoided at all costs. If you just want to say “thank you” that’s fine too, but make sure they have a way to get back to your home page.

If you still find that you’re getting a lot of unsubscribers, take a minute to email them and find out why. It’s possible they’ve changed their interests but in case it’s something you’ve done, you’ll want to find out what happened so you can avoid it in the future. Sometimes you will learn the most from the folks who decide to go, rather than those who have been with you for a long time.

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AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – May 5, 2014
May 5, 2014by: Paula
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Welcome to the Author Marketing Experts Blog Carnival. We have a great mix of tips on getting published, book marketing, writing, and more. Thank you to all of this week’s contributors.

Getting Published

Chrys Fey submitted Author Photo Tips posted at Write With Fey, saying, “As authors, we are in the business of words, not visuals. Readers get to know us through black and white lines, not images, but it is important for writers to have an author photo.”

Erica Verrillo submitted Top 5 Resources for Publishing Poetry posted at Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “If you would like to see your poetry published, here are the top five resources that will provide you with all the information you need to locate the most suitable literary journal for your work. If you want to pursue poetry as a long-term occupation, then do please take a look at the Poetry Society of America’s website and consider joining.”

Green Apple on Books

Book Marketing

Sarah Bolme submitted Use Coupons to Promote Your Book posted at Marketing Christian Books, saying, “Sell more books using coupons.”

Writing

Hope Clark submitted The Awesome Cape of Authorpreneurship posted at C. Hope Clark, saying, “After a hectic two weeks of two conferences, 2500 miles of car travel, and intense demand to be on my game in crowds, I sat down to decompress, review my notes, digest the business cards collected, and write about the new revelations I’ve had about being an authorpreneur.”

Emma Cooper submitted The Paper Trail posted at Emma Cooper, saying, “This blog post is about the ways in which writers record their ideas – the good, the bad and the desperate. It seems as though an old-fashioned note book is the most popular choice.”

Self-Publishing

Jennifer Tribe submitted 8 Must-Have Book Ingredients for Serious Self-Published Authors posted at Clear Prose, saying, “A list of things a self-published non-fiction book must have in order to be taken seriously.”

Colin Dunbar submitted Format a Book in Word: Global Settings posted at Format Book in Word, saying, “With our page size set, we continue with the global settings, and in this post we cover page layout and margins.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/

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Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of April 28, 2014
May 2, 2014by: Paula
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Get some great tips from these top book marketing tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include cover design secrets, Pinterest for writers, blog post timing, and more. Happy marketing!

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* “So You Want To Make A Living Writing? 13 Harsh Truths.”

Writing is a tough occupation, no question about it. But learn how you can succeed:

http://bit.ly/1m6UchJ

writing a book

* When to Hire a Professional When You Self-Publish a Book

There are some major areas where self-published authors should think carefully about whether to handle it themselves or hire a pro:

http://dld.bz/dhvmq

* Pinterest for Writers and Authors: How to Market Your Book

Don’t overlook marketing opportunities on Pinterest. How to get started:

http://dld.bz/dhr92

* Blog Post Timing: When Is Your Best Publication Time?

Look at the research and use it as a guide to make sure your blog posts reach your readers:

http://bit.ly/1pFpRg0

* 8 Cover Design Secrets Used to Manipulate Readers into Buying Books

Your book cover is a vital marketing tool. Use these ideas to catch readers’ attention:

http://bit.ly/1kQiJaV

* 9 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your First TV Interview

Make sure you’re ready before you go on the air:

http://dld.bz/dnYp4

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52 Ways to Market Your Book: Tip #2 – How to Double Your Book Sales on Your Website
April 29, 2014by: Penny
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Welcome to Tip #2 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books.  So, ready? Here we go!

How to Double Your Book Sales on Your Website.

Face it, times are tough! The economy blah, blah, blah. Tell me something new. The key is:

2

Everyone loves a bargain, especially today. And, bargains drive sales. Here’s a great way you can explode your sales:

Call a bargain what you want: a discount, coupon, sale, bonus package, gift with purchase, etc. The point is, people love it. Several weeks ago, we tried an experiment. We decided to bundle my latest title: Red Hot Internet Publicity, with an older book called Book Promotion Made 

Easy. By older I don’t mean outdated, I mean that it was an evergreen title, older to the list so the author had moved on from aggressively promoting it. The match was perfect and on the first launch our sales of Red Hot Internet Publicity quadrupled. I was stunned.

For many publishers, a backlist is either gold or stagnant. In either case, there’s likely a title that you can pair up with a newer one you are promoting. In the case of the bundle mentioned above, I didn’t even write Book Promotion Made Easy. So if you’re looking for pairing options and you don’t have a suitable book in-house to pair it with, consider co-promoting the titles with another author. Not only will you get a quality bundle, but if they have a list they can promote it to, you can participate in their promotion as well.

The breakdown was easy, here’s how we did it. We bundled together my new book Red Hot Internet Publicity with Book Promotion Made Easy. Total value: $30.95.

Red Hot is $18.95 and Book Promotion Made Easy is $12.00.

Book Marketing Experts offered the bundle that offered both books for $20. That’s a 35% savings or $10.95.

Want to know how we did it? I’ll tell you and here’s how you can create your own special website promotions to double or triple sales from your site:

For an example, here’s ours:

http://www.amarketingexpert.com/thank-you-for-subscribing/

Book bundling is a fun and easy way to increase sales of virtually any book. I have found that when I pair up another book with mine at speaking events, I quadruple the sales there as well. Two books for $20? You bet that’s a great offer and not only that, it moves books and moves them quickly.

 

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The Importance of Hashtags
April 25, 2014by: Penny
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You can get more traffic using Hashtags.

It used to be that Hashtags were just used for Twitter, but not anymore. Using Hashtags on sites like G+, Facebook, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Instagram are fantastic ways to drive more engagement. There are also quite a few Hashtag tools to help you find popular tags and track trends.

The Importance of Hashtags

Here are a few to consider:

Hashtags.org has been around forever and is still the best place to dig deeper into Hashtag trends, popularity and if you’re ready to go even deeper, you can see how many times a particular Hashtag has been tweeted in a 24-hour period.

Tagdef.com is great because it gives you a history on any Hashtag. So, for example, try plugging in a Hashtag and it’ll pull up when it was first used, how trendy it is and what the meaning of a Hashtag is. This is great when you’re not sure of the Hashtag you’re using. You want to key into something popular but that also drives a relevant meaning to your message.

 

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Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of April 21, 2014
April 25, 2014by: Paula
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We’ve rounded up some top book marketing tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include pitching agents or editors, maintaining your eBook sales, reaching out to readers, and more. Happy marketing!

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baby with red pencil3

* Can Writing & Self-Publishing Novellas Be Profitable? (Pros & Cons)

Writing shorter pieces can be a great way to keep your readers happy. Author Lindsay Buroker shares her experience:

http://bit.ly/Ql9c1n

* How do Authors Reach out to Readers?

Yes, you want to market, but it’s also about reaching out to readers. One author explains how to do it well:

http://bit.ly/1lsUPpX

* 4 Levels of Editing Explained: Which Service Does Your Book Need?

This piece will walk you through how to find an editor, as well as the four levels of editing:

http://bit.ly/1hps9G5

* What Will You do When Your eBook Sales Slow Down?

Authors need to proactively find their readers, for starters, and not leave it to luck. Get some additional advice:

http://bit.ly/RsIRiP

* 7 Tips for Pitching to an Agent or Editor at a Conference

Don’t be afraid to pitch your book, it can be a great experience. These tips will help get you ready:

http://dld.bz/dgNat

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New Twitter Profiles: What you need to know!
April 23, 2014by: Penny
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Twitter has rolled out their new profiles. Here’s what you need to know to be ready.

The new Twitter profiles are available to everyone. To get it, log into your account and click on “edit” and it will show you (at the top) a button that let’s you explore the new header.

Twitter New Profiles

 

If you don’t have a perfectly sized graphic don’t worry. Twitter will let you resize this. I used a header from our YouTube which was not at all the right size. You’ll need to go in there and play with this a bit, too.

See my profile here:

https://twitter.com/Bookgal

Here is more information:

http://thenextweb.com/twitter/2014/04/22/twitters-new-facebook-like-profile-pages-now-available-users/

And here:

http://mashable.com/2014/04/08/twitters-new-profiles-what-you-need-to-know/

 

 

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52 Ways to Market Your Book: Tip #1 – How to Sell More Books at Events
April 23, 2014by: Penny
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During the next several weeks we’re going to dig into some marketing insight, tips, and insider advice to help you sell more books! Are you ready?

First I want to clear up one misconception:

THE BIGGEST MISTAKE AUTHORS MAKE WHEN MARKETING THEIR BOOK IS MARKETING THEIR BOOK….

No, you didn’t read that wrong. You should never, ever, ever market your book. You should only market what the book can do for your reader.

All of the things we’ll show you during the next several weeks will help you leverage into that form of marketing and, make you more successful in the process. Don’t believe me? Give these tips a shot and see for yourself. If you do them all as they are outlined, they are guaranteed to work. No kidding.

TIP #1

How to Sell More Books at Events

Tip 1

So you got a book event, great! Now you want to maximize it, right? You’ve heard your writing buddies (or perhaps read online) about the lack of attendance at signings so figuring out how to maximize the event, regardless of the numbers might be tricky. While I spend a lot of time addressing online marketing, the offline component is one you shouldn’t overlook and if book events are where you want to focus, then bringing in some ideas to help you sell more books is something you should consider.

If you have an event coming up, consider these ideas before you head out:

  1. Marketing: First and foremost is the marketing of your event. But I’m not talking about the marketing you do in the media (though that is great too) I’m speaking of in-store marketing, this is what most folks seem to overlook. This is where you supply things to the store to help them market your event. Because the first phase of a successful event is driving people to it. Here are a few thoughts.
  2. Do bag stuffers: You can easily do this in your favorite computer program, do two up on a page, meaning that you use one 8 1/2 by 11 sheet of paper to do two fliers. You’ll want to ask the store first if they mind that you provide this, most stores or event venues don’t.
  3. Bookmarks: While most in the industry see these as passé, people still love them. You can do bookmarks and bag stuffers (or staple them to the flier) or you can do custom bookmarks with the date and time of your event. Nowadays it’s pretty easy to get these done cheaply. Keep in mind that if you are having the event in a mall or other type of  shopping area, you might be able to drop the bookmarks (or bag stuffers) off at the nearby stores to see if they’ll help promote the event.
  4. Book signings are boring: Regardless of where you do the event, plan to do a talk instead of a signing. People are drawn into a discussion and are often turned off by an author just sitting at a table. Marketing is about message and movement so stand up and speak. If speaking in public is intimidating to you, go to Toastmasters or some other local networking/speaking group and see what you can learn.
  5. Unique places: If you want to get more attention for your event, consider doing events in unique places. We’ve done them in video stores, electronics stores, gyms, even restaurants (on slow nights), doing outside-the-bookstore events is a great way to gain more interest for your talk. Why? Because you aren’t competing with everyone else at the bookstore for your crowd. When you do an event at a locale that doesn’t normally do events, you’ll gather more people just because it’s considered “unique.”
  6. Make friends: Get to know the bookstore people, but not just on the day of the event. Go in prior and make friends, tell them who you are and maybe even hand them your flier or bookmark (or a stack if you can). Often stores have Information Centers; see if you can leave some fliers there instead of just at the register. Getting to know the people who are selling the book is a great way to help gather more people into your event. If your event isn’t in a bookstore but attached to a shopping area or mall, go around to the stores (and perhaps you did this when you passed out the fliers) and let them know you have an event and what can you do to help them promote it. If you can rally the troops to help you market your talk, you could triple the numbers of people at your event. No kidding.
  7. Book pairing: One way you might be able to round up is by pairing your book with a freebie. When I paired Red Hot Internet Publicity with a second, but smaller, marketing book I took the awkward pricing of $18.95, bumped it up to $20 (so 2 books for $20) and quadrupled my sales after an event. Now the pairing doesn’t have to be a book, it can be a special report or even an eBook that you send to them after the event.
  8. Ease of purchase: Aside from pricing, if you’re doing your own check out make sure that you have many ways consumers can buy your book. I take credit cards at the event, checks and cash. Don’t limit yourself as to what you can take or you will limit your sales.
  9. Post event wrap up: So the event is over, what now? Well, if you got attendees to sign up for your newsletter (you did do that, right?) and now it’s time to send a thank you note for attending and remind them (if they missed the chance at the event) to buy a copy of your book at the “special event price.”

Speaking and book events are great ways to build your platform, but if you aren’t selling books there’s little point in doing them. For many of us, our book is our business card and thus, if we can sell our “business card” we can keep consumers in our funnel. If your book isn’t your business card you still want readers, right? So the marketing both post and during an event is crucial to building your readership. While it’s easy to say that events sell books, they often don’t. I find that if you don’t “work it” you often will find your time wasted. Seek the opportunities when they are made available to you and then maximize them when they are, you’ll be glad you did!

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From Book to Movie: Going High Concept
April 21, 2014by: Paula
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Are you ready to turn your book into a movie? Learn how to build a high concept film idea from Steven Arvanites, a screenwriter and a teacher. Learn more about Steven at: http://www.NYCScreenwriter.org

 

 

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