Book Marketing Blogs

by Penny Sansevieri
12 Secrets to Selling More Books at Events: Tip #25 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
October 8, 2014by: Penny Sansevieri
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Welcome to Tip #25 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books.  So, ready? Here we go!

12 Secrets to Selling More Books at Events

So you got a book event, great! Now you want to maximize it, right? You’ve heard your writing buddies (or perhaps read online) about the lack of attendance at signings so figuring out how to maximize the event, regardless of the numbers might be tricky. While I spend a lot of time addressing online marketing, the offline component is one you shouldn’t overlook and if book events are where you want to focus, then bringing in some ideas to help you sell more books is something you should consider.

Some years back when I was promoting The Cliffhanger I ended up at a book signing in the driving rain, I mean it was pouring and the store was all but empty. It was amazing I sold even one book, let alone seven. While not a big number, the copies were all sold to people who were seeking refuge in the store from the rain and not there for my event. This signing taught me a lot about events and connecting with consumers in stores. If you have an event coming up, consider these ideas before you head out:

Tip 251. Marketing: First and foremost is the marketing of your event. But I’m not talking about the marketing you do in the media (though that is great too) I’m speaking of in-store marketing, this is what most folks seem to overlook. This is where you supply things to the store to help them market your event. Because the first phase of a successful event is driving people to it, here are a few thoughts.

  • Do bag stuffers. You can easily do this in your favorite computer program, do two up on a page, meaning that you use one 8 1/2 by 11 sheet of paper to do two fliers. You’ll want to ask the store first if they mind that you provide this, most stores or event venues don’t.
  • Bookmarks: While most in the industry see these as passé, people still love them. You can do bookmarks and bag stuffers (or staple them to the flier) or you can do custom bookmarks with the date and time of your event. Nowadays it’s pretty easy to get these done cheaply. Keep in mind that if you are having the event in a mall or other type of shopping area, you might be able to drop the bookmarks (or bag stuffers) off at the nearby stores to see if they’ll help promote the event.

2. Book signings are boring: Regardless of where you do the event, plan to do a talk instead of a signing. People are drawn into a discussion and are often turned off by an author just sitting at a table. Marketing is about message and movement so stand up and speak. If speaking in public is intimidating to you, go to Toastmasters or some other local networking/speaking group and see what you can learn.

3. Unique places: If you want to get more attention for your event, consider doing events in unique places. We’ve done them in video stores, electronics stores, gyms, even restaurants (on slow nights), doing outside-the-bookstore events is a great way to gain more interest for your talk. Why? Because you aren’t competing with everyone else at the bookstore for your crowd. When you do an event at a locale that doesn’t normally do events, you’ll gather more people just because it’s considered “unique.”

4. Show up early and talk it up: OK so let’s say you’re in the store and there are a ton of people in there shopping (a book event dream, yes?) I suggest that you take your extra bag stuffers or custom bookmarks and just hand them to the people in the store. Let them know you are doing an event at such and such time and you’d love it if they can sit in. You’ll be surprised how many new people you might pull in this way.

5.  Customize: Regardless of what your talk is about, poll the audience first to see a) what brought them there, or b) what they hope to learn if your talk is educational. I suggest this because the more you can customize your discussion, the more likely you are to sell a book. If you can solve problems (and this is often done during the Q&A) all the better. You’ll look like the answer machine you are and readers love that. If you have the answers they’ll want to buy from you. I promise.

6. Make friends: Get to know the bookstore people, but not just on the day of the event. Go in prior and make friends, tell them who you are and maybe even hand them your flier or bookmark (or a stack if you can). Often stores have Information Centers; see if you can leave some fliers there instead of just at the register. Getting to know the people who are selling the book is a great way to help gather more people into your event. If your event isn’t in a bookstore but attached to a shopping area or mall, go around to the stores (and perhaps you did this when you passed out the fliers) and let them know you have an event and what can you do to help them promote it. If you can rally the troops to help you market your talk, you could triple the numbers of people at your event. No kidding.

7.  Take names: I always, always recommend that you get names and (email) addresses from the folks who attended. Sign them up for your mailing list is a great way to stay in touch with them and stay on your reader’s radar screen. If you have a giveaway or drawing, great! This will help you to collect names. If you don’t, offer them a freebie or ebook after the event. Often if I’m doing a PowerPoint presentation I will put together a set of them (delivered in PDF) after the event. Attendees need to sign up to get them and then once they do, I include them in our newsletter list which helps me to stay on their radar screen.

8. Pricing: Make sure your book is easy to buy. If you are doing this outside of a bookstore this is easy to do and will help your sales. I find that a rounded number like $10 or $20 makes for a quick and easy sale. If you can round up or down without adding or losing too much to the price, by all means do it.

9. Book pairing: One way you might be able to round up is by pairing your book with a freebie. When I paired Red Hot Internet Publicity with a second, but smaller, marketing book I took the awkward pricing of $18.95, bumped it up to $20 (so 2 books for $20) and quadrupled my sales after an event. Now the pairing doesn’t have to be a book, it can be a special report or even an ebook that you send to them after the event.

10.  Product and placement: As you’re doing your talk (especially if it’s in a non-bookstore venue) make sure that you have a copy of the book propped up in front of you so event visitors see it the entire time you are speaking. Hold up the book when appropriate and use it as an example when you can. This will help to direct the consumer’s eye to the book – and making eye contact with the product is a good way to make sure it stays on their radar screen throughout your talk. When I do a speaking gig at an event that allows me to sell books in the room, I will sell four times more than I would if the attendees have to go somewhere else to buy it so make the buy easy. If you can, make sure your books are for sale in the room.

11. Ease of purchase: Aside from pricing, if you’re doing your own checkout make sure that you have many ways consumers can buy your book. I take credit cards at the event, checks and cash. Don’t limit yourself as to what you can take or you will limit your sales.

12. . Post event wrap up: So the event is over, what now? Well, if you got attendees to sign up for your newsletter (you did do that, right?) and now it’s time to send a thank you note for attending and remind them (if they missed the chance at the event) to buy a copy of your book at the “special event price.”

Speaking and book events are great ways to build your platform, but if you aren’t selling books there’s little point in doing them. For many of us, our book is our business card and thus, if we can sell our “business card” we can keep consumers in our funnel. If your book isn’t your business card you still want readers, right? So the marketing both post and during an event is crucial to building your readership. While it’s easy to say that events sell books, they often don’t. I find that if you don’t “work it” you often will find your time wasted. Seek the opportunities when they are made available to you and then maximize them when they are, you’ll be glad you did!

Want the complete book of tips? Get it here!

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AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – October 6, 2014
October 6, 2014by: Paula
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Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. We have some great tips on writing, and getting published this week. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Writing

Hazel Longuet submitted Writing Tips: 10 Most Pinned Articles on Writing from my Pinterest Feed posted at Novel Experience, saying, “For the last year I’ve been squirreling away high quality content on writing and publishing, and storing my little nuggets of gold in Pinterest. I’d wondered which of all these gems were most popular, as identified by repins, but until recently there were few ways to find out. Then those lovely bods at Pinterest launched their Analytics a program that delves into statistics of Pins. So now I know which of the pins my followers like best and can share them with you.”

Susan Pohlman submitted Feeling Stuck in Your Writing? The Answer is Travel posted at The Review Review, saying, “Finding your writer’s voice through travel.”

writer typewriter keys

Chrys Fey submitted Naming Fictional Towns and Cities posted at Write With Fey, saying, “When you’re writing a book, you get to name your characters, so why can’t you name the town your story is set in? You can!”

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted 2 Literary Agents Actively Seeking Writers posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “Here are two agents actively building their client lists. Brent is a new agent at TriadaUS. Lana is an established agent with a list of clients that she is seeking to expand. In terms of genre, they are looking for just about everything.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of September 29, 2014
October 3, 2014by: Paula
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Let these book marketing tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others, provide some inspiration. The topics include launching your book virtually, breaking through writers’ block, finding the right freelance editor, and more. Happy marketing!

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* Don’t Wait For Permission: Why Authors Should Be Entrepreneurs

Your book can be the basis for other opportunities such as audio, direct sales, graphic novels, and much more:

http://davidgaughran.wordpress.com/2014/09/30/dont-wait-for-permission-why-authors-should-be-entrepreneurs/

tips 5

* How to Create a Street Team for Your Book

Discover ways to get your community of followers to help spread the word about your book:

http://buildbookbuzz.com/how-to-create-a-street-team-for-your-book/

* 5 Networking Tips for Authors

Learn which networking events are worth your time, or not, and why you should have business cards:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/5-networking-tips-for-writers

* Book Launch Checklist – Before, During, and After Publication

This handy guide covers book inception through your first month of publication (and there’s a downloadable version):

http://kelsye.com/book-launch-checklist/

* 5 Ways to Find the Right Freelance Book Editor

Learn what qualities to look for, and more importantly, where you can find qualified editors:

http://janefriedman.com/2013/05/31/find-freelance-book-editor/

* An Author’s Best Friends: Booksellers and Librarians

People who buy and sell books for a living are valuable contacts. Here’s how you can maximize the relationship:

http://publishingperspectives.com/2014/09/an-authors-best-friends-booksellers-and-librarians/

* Breaking Through Writer’s Block 

There are different reasons you hit a wall; get some suggestions for how to get writing again:

http://www.writersfunzone.com/blog/2014/08/21/breaking-writers-block/

* 5 Guidelines for Approaching Book Review Bloggers

If you’d like to get book reviews, these tips will help you identify the best bloggers for your book:

http://blog.janicehardy.com/2014/08/5-guidelines-for-approaching-book.html

* 10 Steps to Launch Your Book Virtually

Ready to publish your book? These ideas will give you some ways to let readers know your book is available:

http://writeonsisters.com/the-road-to-publication/plan-to-launch-your-book-virtually/

* 14 Never-Fail Tricks Every Writer Needs to Know

Great ideas for getting your book back on track:

http://annerallen.blogspot.com/2014/09/block-busting-14-never-fail-tricks.html



The Best Marketing Tool You Aren’t Using
October 2, 2014by: Penny Sansevieri
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The Best Marketing Tool You Aren't UsingThe world is big and readers are everywhere. I tell authors this and their eyes often light up. On the other hand, these same authors will tell me “I don’t want to ship books internationally.” This statement always amazes me. By cutting out an international market you may be missing out on a lot of readers, possible international sales, as well as overseas exposure. But, to cut costs, authors often start there.

Right now, I’m going to show you a few shortcuts to doing overseas mailings without breaking the bank.

If you’re an overseas author, you might be in a reverse situation. It’s almost impossible to ship anything to the US without spending a bundle on postage. I know for a fact that most international postage from foreign countries costs three times what it does in the US. But there is a solution for this as well, which I’ve addressed below.

To mail internationally, we use a system called Stamps.com. This online program allows you a few options when it comes to mailings. In most cases, I can ship books for less than it costs to ship Priority Mail in the US and many times, the packages even arrive quicker.

Take a look at the screenshot, you can see that even if your book is four pounds (and most books aren’t) you’re still only paying $5.10.

 

International Postage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’re an overseas author doing US promotion consider this: Amazon Prime. A subscription to Amazon Prime will allow you to ship anywhere in the US for free. You can even include a quick note with the package. We had an author who was traveling in Italy and had a dozen or so review requests while he was gone. Since he was shipping these himself this presented a problem. The easy solution was to go into your Amazon account, set up the book to ship, include a note and you’re done.  Yes, you do pay full price for the books but you’ll get a royalty back which will offset it. It’s also a very quick and reliable way to get your copies shipped.

Cutting out international readers is just not a smart marketing move. But by knowing your option, you can incorporate this market without breaking the bank.

 



Eight Strategies to Use Breaking News to Buzz Your Book: Tip #24 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
September 30, 2014by: Penny Sansevieri
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Welcome to Tip #24 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books!

It seems that these days, more than ever, the news is never-ending. There is always some hot story the media is running with. The latest security breach or political scandal and of course always a favorite, the pop-culture stuff like the Kanye-Kim Christmas gifts (that purse, really?)

What happens if there’s breaking news that you can comment on? Have you ever watched a story and thought, “Wait, I could add to this conversation.” So, do you just sit by and hope someone will call you? No! You take action. But how? Well, first, it’s important to get into the conversation. Especially if it’s on your topic or within your area of expertise. If you can lend insight to a subject that’s being widely discussed on social media, covered on television or hotly debated on your favorite cable talk show, then it might be worth getting yourself out there. Here are a few tips to hook your story on the latest breaking news topic.

Tip 241. Blog on it: If you have a blog that has any kind of a readership, and even if you don’t: be sure to blog on it. A blog is a great place to share your opinion on the subject and even (when appropriate) offer a solution.

2. Twitter: The first thing you should be doing (even before you start blogging) is hopping on Twitter and joining the conversation via the hashtag (or hashtags) that are being used. You can find these easily by doing a search. Posting to the hashtags, maybe even referencing your post, could be a great way to drive consumer and media interest to your topic and your blog. Keep in mind that the media is on Twitter and they just might find you!

3. Blog comment: Don’t have an active blog? Or want to enhance your current post with some additional fodder? Then why not head to some high-traffic blogs that are discussing this topic and start posting your viewpoint? You never know where it could take you. At the very least, you could get some traffic back to your site.

4. Share your blog post: If you blog on this, you need to share it, so be sure to add links to this on all your social sites and use the hashtag(s) identified with this story to help pull more eyes to your post.

5. Contact your local media: One of the best ways to get local media interested in you is to offer them a local angle on a national story. Let’s say we’re addressing the fear of traveling to the Winter Olympics, or perhaps protecting yourself against ID theft, these are both good stories to spin locally if you have the expertise.

6. Contact national media: If you have a subject that’s drawing national attention and your message is significant or different enough to pitch to a national show, then get out there and start pitching. Remember: with so many shows on the air all competing for audience attention they’re all looking for a new and different angle. Be sure that you have a strong subject line, especially if it’s a major news story because you know they’re getting a lot of pitches and you’ll need to stand out.

7. Make sure you’re getting HARO, http://www.helpareporter.com/: HARO is a newsletter that arrives as often as three times a day and it’s packed with media leads. If there’s a hot story there will be a media person on HARO looking for someone to comment on it.

8. Get Media Alerts: Make sure you *always* have your keywords in alert systems like Talkwalker.com or Mention.net. You want to be aware of who’s saying what about your topic. Also, during non-breaking news times this is a good way to get to know media that covers your story and network with them, so that when a breaking story hits, they already know you.

Breaking news doesn’t have to leave you, your story, or your book in the dust. So often authors tell me they see “experts” on TV and they feel they can do better. Well, now’s your chance. The next time a breaking news topic hits the airwaves, jump on it. You just never know what could happen.



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – September 29, 2014
September 29, 2014by: Paula
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Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. This week we have posts offering insights on social media, writing, getting published, and book marketing. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Social Media

Hazel Longuet submitted Pinterest Growth: The Best Kept Secret For Growing your Pinterest Following & Gaining Repins posted at A Novel Experience, saying, “Pinterest is fast becoming one of the largest and most influential Social Media sites. Grow your Pinterest followers and gain more exposure for your pins in a simple 10 minute a day routine in-conjunction with, the web’s best kept Pinterest secret, Viralwoot. I’ll show you the steps to take – it’s free & I’m giving you a gift at the end. What could be better?”

pinterest graphic

Book Marketing

Sarah Bolme submitted Are You Using This Book Selling Technique? posted at Marketing Christian Books, saying, “Pinterest is a social media site that is growing and one that should not be ignored when marketing a book. Learn one quick technique to effectively promote your book on Pinterest.”

Writing

Janet Ursel submitted Haiku Cows and Twitter posted at Janet Ursel, saying, “What’s your daily warm-up exercise?”

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted Agents Looking for Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers posted at Publishing … And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “Science fiction and fantasy never go out of style, so if you write in either of these genres, you are in luck. Here is a list of reputable agents who represent fantasy and/or science fiction novels. All of them are accepting queries as of this writing.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of September 22, 2014
September 26, 2014by: Paula
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book with cashWe’ve collected some of the top book marketing tweets to help guide your promotion, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include why your book sales suck, how to create compelling book covers, what readers want from authors on social media, and more. Happy marketing!

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* Why Authors Must Be Marketers

Whether you self-publish or have a traditional publishing deal you need to know how to market your books:

http://www.theindependentpublishingmagazine.com/2014/09/authors-must-be-marketers-neil-raphel.html

* What Readers Want from Authors on Social Media

There are five things readers respond to, starting with inspiration. Learn what you can do:

http://christinenolfi.com/2014/09/readers-want-authors-social-media/

* 4 Steps to Take Charge of Your Book Launch

You want to start off on the right foot so your book has a fighting chance:

http://selfpublishingteam.com/4-steps-to-take-charge-of-your-book-launch/

* 10 Book Marketing Mistakes Self-Published Authors Make

Don’t just publish your book and expect the sales to take off. Here’s what you need to do first:

http://blog.bibliocrunch.com/10-book-marketing-mistakes-self-published-authors-make/

* How to Create Compelling Book Covers in 15 Minutes

Book covers are a vital part of your book’s success. Get some tips from Guy Kawasaki:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pi9RPcpkNgE

* Advice to Writers Seeking Literary Agents

Chuck Sambuchino of Writer’s Digest books pulled together some of the best advice from agents. Here are their tips:

http://writersinthestorm.wordpress.com/2013/11/01/agent-wisdom-volume-ii-more-advice-for-writers-from-literary-agents/

* Tips for Vetting a Book Blogger’s Platform

So, you want to do a blog tour? Or you’re looking for book reviewers? Here’s how you can determine which bloggers have enough of an audience:

http://www.molly-greene.com/tips-for-vetting-book-bloggers/

* 8 Reasons Why Your Book Sales Suck

Use this list to figure out what you need to do to improve your marketing and sell more books:

http://www.virtualbusinesstrainingnetwork.com/author/8-reasons-why-your-book-sales-suck/



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – September 22, 2014
September 22, 2014by: Paula
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Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. This week we have some great tips on book marketing, writing, and book publicity. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Book Marketing

Mayowa Ajisafe submitted Should You Pay to Market and Promote Your Books? posted at Authors Crib, saying, “Free is always an option for many authors with book marketing but it takes time, energy and consistency to see great success with any of these free ideas, channels or strategies…But Should Authors Pay To Market Their Book?”

Writing

Chrys Fey submitted Chapter Titles posted at Write With Fey, saying, “Many people think chapter titles are just for juvenile books, but that’s not true. Chapter titles are great for fantasy, science-fiction, and historical novels. If you want to use chapter titles in your book, you very well can! Remember: It’s your book; you can do what you want!”

book review word cloud

Book Publicity

Erica Verrillo submitted List of Reviewers for Traditionally Published Books posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “This is a list of reviewers who exclusively review works that have been published by publishing houses (large and small). Publishers, unfortunately, do the bare minimum to solicit reviews. So, you will need to contact reviewers yourself. But even if you have self-published a book, you can sell your published short stories on Amazon; they will need reviews.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of September 15, 2014
September 19, 2014by: Paula
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Discover some tips and insights into book marketing via these tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include building an audience on YouTube, generating authentic book reviews, reviving ebook sales, and more. Happy marketing!

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* Five Ways to Generate Authentic Book Reviews

There are plenty of fake reviewers out there – amazingly enough, some of them even charge for their reviews. Here are some ways you can get more authentic reviews that will help your book:

http://michaelhardach.blogspot.com/2014/09/five-ways-to-generate-authentic-book.html

* The Secret to Publishing Success in the Era of Social Media: Teaming with Your Fellow Authors

If you view other authors as only competition, you could be missing out. Authors who collaborate on book promotion can get exposure and sales for everyone involved. Learn more:

http://annerallen.blogspot.com/2014/09/the-secret-to-publishing-success-in-era.html

* 34 Blogging Topics Just for Writers

Do you have a case of blogger’s block? These ideas should get your creative juices flowing:

http://socialmediajustforwriters.com/34-blogging-topics-just-writers/

A background of question mark signs and symbols to illustrate le

* 30 Little-Known Features of Facebook, Twitter, and More

You can save links on Facebook to read later. Twitter allows you to create a custom timeline. Discover additional, helpful social media features:

http://blog.bufferapp.com/little-known-features-facebook-twitter-instagram

* How to Build an Audience on YouTube

There are more than 1 billion unique users watching video on YouTube every month. Here are some ways you can build an audience on the site:

http://www.socialmediatoday.com/content/how-build-audience-youtube

* Ebook Sales Down? Here Are 15 Tips!

At some point, your ebook sales will dip. But you don’t have to give up. J.A. Konrath offers some options for boosting ebook sales once again:

http://jakonrath.blogspot.com/2014/09/ebook-sales-down-here-are-15-tips.html

* How to Sell Books by the Truckload on Amazon

In this interview on Denise Wakeman’s show, Adventures in Visibility, Penny Sansevieri talks about how to get more visibility on Amazon so you can sell more books:

https://soundcloud.com/denise-wakeman/adventures-in-visibility-how-to-sell-books-by-the-truckload-on-amazon

* 21 Power Tips to Get Your Blog Content Shared On Facebook & Twitter

When you publish blog posts, it’s only the beginning. You want people to read what you wrote. Here’s what you can do to get more people to share your posts:

http://www.jeffbullas.com/2011/03/30/21-power-tips-to-get-your-blog-content-shared-on-facebook-twitter/

* Kill Me Now – What Do I Do About a Negative Review?

Bad reviews suck. They do. But you definitely don’t want to get into a battle with the reviewer because you will lose. Get some productive tips for dealing with negative reviews:

http://nailyournovel.wordpress.com/2014/09/07/kill-me-now-what-do-i-do-about-a-negative-review/

* How Much Should You Charge For Your E-Book? 7 Questions to Help You Decide

There is no ideal price because several factors come into play when pricing ebooks. But these 7 questions will help you focus and make the best choice for your ebook:

http://www.makealivingwriting.com/how-much-should-you-charge-for-your-e-book-7-questions/



Reuse, Recycle and Repurpose Your Existing Content
September 18, 2014by: Penny Sansevieri
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By now we’ve all heard the endless chatter about Google’s issues with duplicate content. In the past, we could easily re-run pieces in a variety of places. Some experts I know reused articles as many as twenty times, but if you do that now you may find your site in a lot of trouble and severely penalized by the Google-Gods.

So what’s a marketer to do? I was considering this the other day when I was trying to figure out what to blog about because the other issue is that Google does not want “thin” content, which is content that isn’t compelling, thin in data or light in information. Basically they don’t want people just throwing stuff on their blog to get traffic.

We’re all in a creative industry but that does not necessarily mean that we are an endless font of creative ideas. Then I thought: instead of coming up with new ideas, I wonder how many times I can reuse old ones in a way that won’t get us into trouble.

So here are my five favorites, a variety of different things you can do with the same piece of content.

For my complete list of 20 ways to reuse, recycle and repurpose content check out my article in HuffPo here.

Now I’m not suggesting that you do this with each and every blog post, but if you have ideas or posts that seem to have legs (and we all know that not all of them will) then maybe it’s time to see how far you can stretch them.

20 Ways To Reuse, Recycle and Repurpose Content – TOP FIVE 4 - 20 Recycle Ways

-  Update Past Posts with Industry Updates – At some point, even the best and most creative posts need to be updated. Now’s the time to go through your old posts and see what can be updated and reused. Pull in new content and add a fresh take, your readers will love it.

-  Pull Blog Content into an Infographic - Combine several of your text-based posts into more visual content – such as an aggregated infographic or chart.

-  Tips - Create a tips list from a blog post you did and then create images from it to use on Pinterest, in Twitter, on Instagram, etc. We did this for our 52 Ways to Sell More Books.

-  Quizzes - People love quizzes, when we did ours on “Which Social Media Site is Right for You” people just ate it up. Most of the time it’s just grabbing existing content you’ve done, but it’s a fantastic way to repurpose your stuff.

–  Turn content into trading cards or other swag: I had trading cards made for my book, How to Sell Your Books By The Truckload on Amazon. I pulled different tips I had already written, and put one tip per card. I took these around to speaking events and mail them with everything. People love them.

It’s important that you get as much mileage out of what you write as you possibly can, and with all of the new places to post (Pinterest, Instagram, Vine, etc.) it’s become easier than ever to create virtual “breadcrumbs” that lead readers back to your website which, in the end, is the ultimate goal.

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