Book Marketing Blogs

by Penny Sansevieri
Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of November 3, 2014
November 7, 2014by: Paula
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Get up to date with these book marketing tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include the new Amazon keywords, how NaNoWriMo can help you write a novel, book review query etiquette, and more. Happy marketing!

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* 30 Days to a Finished Book: How #NaNoWriMo Can Help You Write a Novel

There’s still time to write that novel for NaNoWriMo. One author shares how she did it:

http://moneymakingmillennials.com/30-days-finished-book-nanowrimo-can-help-write-novel-joanna-penn/

* Unique Holiday Book Promotion Ideas

There’s more to holidays than Christmas. There are many off-beat and lesser-known holidays that you can use to market your book:

http://www.amarketingexpert.com/unique-holiday-book-promotion/

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* Why Being Human on Social Media Is the Best Strategy You’ll Ever Have

Tactics and tools have their place in your social media strategy, but don’t forget about the most powerful tactic of all – be yourself:

http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/238871

* A Must for Authors: Book Review Query Etiquette

Here are a few simple – but often overlooked – guidelines to getting legitimate reviews for your book:

http://www.quanietalkswriting.com/2014/08/11/book-review-query-etiquette/

* 7 Social Media Myths (That You Probably Think Are True)

A recent survey revealed that most marketers are still confused by social media. You don’t have to be one of the statistics:

http://www.mediabistro.com/alltwitter/social-media-myths_b61188

* Why Authors Should Hire a Copy Editor

Learn why finding a good copy editor makes sense for your books and your writing career:

http://www.selfpublishingreview.com/2014/10/should-you-use-a-copy-editor/

* 4 Social Platforms More Popular Than Facebook

These networks can expand your global platform. Check them out:

http://www.socialmediatoday.com/content/4-social-platforms-more-popular-facebook

* The New Keywords on Amazon

It’s time for a refresher on Amazon keywords because they’ve changed again, to “themes:”

http://www.amarketingexpert.com/new-keywords-amazon/



The New Keywords on Amazon
November 4, 2014by: Penny Sansevieri
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Keywords on Amazon are changing again. Amazon has recently rolled out Amazon “themes” – which will replace some of your keywords. Why do themes matter? Because readers search this verbiage to find the books they want. Using this tool will help you gain more exposure and visibility on Amazon!
 



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of October 27, 2014
October 31, 2014by: Paula
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We’ve got some great tips from these book marketing tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include getting your book into Costco, creating audiobooks, generating increased blog traffic, and more. Happy marketing!

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* Is It Done Yet? How to Know if Your Book is Ready to Market

This helpful post will give you some pointers so you can determine whether you need to revise or move onto the next stage of your book publishing journey:

http://selfmadewriter.blogspot.com/2014/10/is-it-done-yet-how-to-know-if-your-book.html

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* Audiobooks: The Next Big Thing

Audio books are big business, and growing. Here’s what you need to know to create an audio book:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/penny-c-sansevieri/audiobooks-the-next-big-t_b_6067044.html

* Alternatives for GoodReads: Riffle, LibraryThing & BookLikes

Goodreads offers a lot of value, but from time to time it’s also got controversy. If you want some worthwhile alternatives, here are some options:

http://socialmediajustforwriters.com/finding-alternatives-for-goodreads-riffle-librarything-booklikes/

* 10 Ideas That You Can Use to Generate Blog Traffic and Interest

Does your blog content seem dry, and have user visits declined? Learn how to revitalize your blog:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20141028021039-105082339-10-ideas-that-you-can-use-to-generate-blog-traffic-and-interest

* How to Make Your Book Cover Stand Out

So many more books are published these days, making it more important than ever that you have a compelling book cover. Find out what it takes to make a book cover appeal to potential buyers:

http://www.booksandsuch.com/blog/make-book-cover-stand/

* 8 Ways to be a Rockstar Author

Discover how you can set yourself apart from the competition:

http://www.selfpublishingreview.com/2014/10/eight-ways-to-be-a-rockstar-author/

* Top 5 Ways Authors Sabotage Their Own Book

Here’s a hint: it involves editing (or lack thereof). What you should know:

http://www.thebookdesigner.com/2014/10/shayla-eaton/

* How to Get Your Book Into Costco (and other specialty stores)

Have you thought about having your book stocked at a store like Costco? Learn how the process works:

http://thefutureofink.com/get-your-book-into-costco/



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – October 20, 2014
October 27, 2014by: Paula
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Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. This week features some insights on self-publishing, and writing. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Writing

Dale Napier submitted Stay-at-Home Retreats posted at Dale Napier, saying, “It’s about creating a stay-at-home writing retreat, versus the vacation-style writing retreat.”

Erica Verrillo submitted 10 November Writing Contests – No Entry Fee posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “I am a fan of free writing contests: 1) Having a deadline forces you to finish your manuscript, 2) If you win, you can call yourself an “award-winning author” which is great for your pub cred. (That’s like street cred – without the tattoos.) 3) And if the contest is free, what have you got to lose?”

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Self-Publishing

Hazel Longuet submitted Writer’s Toolkit: PodCasts for Writers posted at Novel Experience, saying, “I’m a very, late developer when it comes to watching podcasts but now I’m an addict – here are the best podcasts for writers that I’ve found. Check them out.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of October 20, 2014
October 24, 2014by: Paula
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ChecklistGet some publishing and marketing insights from these book marketing tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include top 5 marketing tips for indie authors, how to choose an effective book title, Amazon payments, and more. Happy marketing!

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* Short Stories as a Path to Literary Success

Short fiction can get your name in front of editors, agents, and fans, and builds your resume:

http://blog.pshares.org/index.php/the-ploughshares-round-down-short-stories-as-a-path-to-literary-success/

* How Much Will I Get Paid From Amazon?

Some terrific tips and tricks to help you understand what Amazon will pay you (and when):

http://www.bigskywords.com/writing-blog/how-much-will-i-get-paid-from-amazon

* 5 BS Indicators for Writers Conferences

Not all conferences are created equal. Here are issues to monitor:

http://victoriamixon.com/2014/09/08/5-bs-indicators-for-writers-conferences-2/

* How to Cultivate Customers in an Age of Content Fatigue and Cluttered Markets

There’s a lot of noise in the online world, but there are still ways you can reach your audience:

http://www.smallbusinesspr.com/pr-learning-center/small-biz-articles/How-to-Cultivate-Customers-in-an-Age-of-Content-Fatigue-and-Cluttered-Markets.html

* How to Choose a Book Title That’s Perfect for Your Story AND Good Marketing!

Sure, you want a catchy title but you also want one that helps your book be more marketable:

http://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/2014/10/book-title.html

* The Latest Trends in the Indie Author Market

It’s quite interesting: longer ebooks are in; pre-orders offer a sales advantage, and more:

http://janefriedman.com/2014/07/10/indie-author-trends/

* A Self-Publishing Checklist for First-Time Authors

There’s a lot of work involved in self-publishing your book, and this checklist will keep you on track:

http://www.writingforward.com/getting-published/self-publishing/self-publishing-checklist-first-time-authors

* Top 5 Marketing Tips for Indie Authors

Some useful recommendations for ways you can increase book sales:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ak-turner/marketing-tips-for-indie-authors_b_6010956.html

* Write Your Passion But Keep an Eye on the Market

While writing what you love is important, you want to make sure the genre you select is also selling:

http://kayedacus.com/2014/09/16/writing-tip-9-write-your-passion-but-keep-an-eye-on-the-market/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of October 13, 2014
October 17, 2014by: Paula
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Grow your expertise with insights from these book marketing tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include creating query letters and cover letters, finding free images, getting website traffic, and more. Happy marketing!

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* How to Get Traffic to Your Author Website: 30+ Tips for Discouraged Writers

It does take time to get visitors to your site, and it’s not about numbers, it’s about attracting the right people:

http://www.yourwriterplatform.com/author-website-traffic/

* Finding Twitter Chats for Writers

Twitter chats offer a chance to connect with readers, learn from other authors, network with industry professionals, and more:

http://badredheadmedia.com/2014/07/31/finding-twitter-chats-guest-k8tilton/

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* Book Contests for Indie Authors

Your self-published book can gain an edge if you win an award. Here are contests to consider:

http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/book-contests-for-indie-authors.html

* Query and Cover Letters 101: The Fundamentals

This is a great post for beginners. Learn the difference between query letters and cover letters and how to write them:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/14/cover-letters_n_5317669.html

* The Best Places to Find Free, High-Resolution Images

Here are 18 sites you can check out:

http://www.labnol.org/internet/find-free-images/24990/

* How to Deal With Negative Reviews of Our Books

No one likes negative reviews. But bookmark this post to guide you if, or when, you receive a bad review:

http://blog.marketingtipsforauthors.com/2009/08/how-to-deal-with-negative-reviews-of.html

* How to Fail at Being a Writer

These steps are guaranteed to lead to failure. And it never hurts to have a little laugh:

http://kelsye.com/fail-at-being-a-writer/

* 4 Ways Authors Can Rock on Twitter

Many authors find Twitter is a great way to connect with their audience. Here’s how you can look like a pro:

http://www.thebookdesigner.com/2014/08/4-ways-authors-can-rock-on-twitter/



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – October 13, 2014
October 13, 2014by: Paula
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Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. We’ve got some great posts on book marketing, self-publishing, and getting published this week. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Book Marketing

Sarah Bolme submitted Sampling: An Effective Marketing Tool posted at Marketing Christian Books, saying, “One of the things I really enjoy about my monthly trip to Costco is all the samples I get to munch on while I peruse the aisles and shop. A few of these samples have even convinced me to buy the products being hawked.”

Kimberly Grabas submitted How to Get Traffic to Your Author Website: 30+ Tips for Discouraged Writers posted at Your Writer Platform, saying, “It’s time to address one of the biggest complaints I get from writers about their author websites: ‘My blog is a ghost town! How do I get more traffic to my site?’ Obviously, no visitors means no visibility, no way for people to discover and share your content, and no real benefit to slugging away, post after post, crafting brilliance that nobody reads. But your author website can be a foundational element to building a powerful platform, if you know how to attract the “right” people to your site AND retain as many of them as possible. Interested in learning how? I’ve got you covered. ;-)”

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Frances Caballo submitted How to Stop Wasting Time and Focus Your Book Marketing posted at Social Media Just for Writers, saying, “I used to tell my audiences that they needed to diversify their social media to reach their audience wherever they might be. I no longer give that advice. Instead, it’s important to determine which social platforms your audience uses and invest your energies strategically. By doing this, authors will be more focused in their marketing and have more time to write.”

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted Beggars Can Be Choosers – How to Pick an Agent posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “When an agent offers to represent a writer, there is tendency to say “Yes, a thousand times yes!” before giving the long-term consequences of the union the cold, hard reflection it deserves. Here are a few tips to help you evaluate an agent before you get hitched.”

Self-Publishing

Hazel Longuet submitted Why are you reading this blog? Go read ‘Write. Publish. Repeat.’ – a must read for all Indie Authors posted at A Novel Experience, saying, “Sometimes you stumble on something akin to the Holy Grail by sheer accident. Something so big, so powerful that it forever changes the way you think and act. I have to believe that the universe only puts things in front of you when you are ready for them, I just wish I’d been ready earlier for Write. Publish. Repeat. It’s simply a must read.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of October 6, 2014
October 10, 2014by: Paula
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We’ve collected some of the most informative and popular book marketing tweets to provide some tips, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include memoir writing tips, how to use SlideShare for social sharing, ways to make your media pitch irresistible, and more. Happy marketing!

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* How to Stop Wasting Time and Focus Your Book Marketing

You do not have to be active on every social media site. Instead, choose wisely so you focus on the sites that work for you:

http://socialmediajustforwriters.com/stop-wasting-time-focus-book-marketing/

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* The Secrets Behind Book Categories on Amazon

What you should know when selecting your book’s categories:

http://www.amarketingexpert.com/secret-book-categories-amazon/

* 7 Ways to Add Sizzle to Your Next Book Event

There’s so much more than bookstore events. Here’s how you can have a great book launch party:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/7-ways-to-add-sizzle-to-your-next-book-event

* Make Your Media Pitches Irresistible Using These Insider Secrets

Get the scoop from a former CBS news executive so you can make your pitches count:

http://www.vocus.com/blog/batt-humphreys-insider-secrets-to-the-perfect-pitch-webinar-recap/

* 40+ Resources & Tools to Take Your Blogging & Social Media Marketing to the Next Level

If you haven’t started a blog, this guide will walk you through the process. It’s easy!

http://www.jeffbullas.com/resources/

* 6 Tips for Avoiding Writer’s Block

These tricks of the trade can help you get writing again.

http://www.socialmediatoday.com/content/6-tips-avoiding-writers-block

* The Power of SlideShare for Social Sharing

Do you use SlideShare? The site can be a great way to build buzz. Learn how:

http://www.webinknow.com/the-power-of-slideshare-for-social-sharing

* Six Lessons about Memoir Writing

Author Abigail Carter shares tips from a recent retreat:

http://kelsye.com/six-lessons-memoir-writing/



12 Secrets to Selling More Books at Events: Tip #25 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
October 8, 2014by: Penny Sansevieri
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Welcome to Tip #25 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books.  So, ready? Here we go!

12 Secrets to Selling More Books at Events

So you got a book event, great! Now you want to maximize it, right? You’ve heard your writing buddies (or perhaps read online) about the lack of attendance at signings so figuring out how to maximize the event, regardless of the numbers might be tricky. While I spend a lot of time addressing online marketing, the offline component is one you shouldn’t overlook and if book events are where you want to focus, then bringing in some ideas to help you sell more books is something you should consider.

Some years back when I was promoting The Cliffhanger I ended up at a book signing in the driving rain, I mean it was pouring and the store was all but empty. It was amazing I sold even one book, let alone seven. While not a big number, the copies were all sold to people who were seeking refuge in the store from the rain and not there for my event. This signing taught me a lot about events and connecting with consumers in stores. If you have an event coming up, consider these ideas before you head out:

Tip 251. Marketing: First and foremost is the marketing of your event. But I’m not talking about the marketing you do in the media (though that is great too) I’m speaking of in-store marketing, this is what most folks seem to overlook. This is where you supply things to the store to help them market your event. Because the first phase of a successful event is driving people to it, here are a few thoughts.

  • Do bag stuffers. You can easily do this in your favorite computer program, do two up on a page, meaning that you use one 8 1/2 by 11 sheet of paper to do two fliers. You’ll want to ask the store first if they mind that you provide this, most stores or event venues don’t.
  • Bookmarks: While most in the industry see these as passé, people still love them. You can do bookmarks and bag stuffers (or staple them to the flier) or you can do custom bookmarks with the date and time of your event. Nowadays it’s pretty easy to get these done cheaply. Keep in mind that if you are having the event in a mall or other type of shopping area, you might be able to drop the bookmarks (or bag stuffers) off at the nearby stores to see if they’ll help promote the event.

2. Book signings are boring: Regardless of where you do the event, plan to do a talk instead of a signing. People are drawn into a discussion and are often turned off by an author just sitting at a table. Marketing is about message and movement so stand up and speak. If speaking in public is intimidating to you, go to Toastmasters or some other local networking/speaking group and see what you can learn.

3. Unique places: If you want to get more attention for your event, consider doing events in unique places. We’ve done them in video stores, electronics stores, gyms, even restaurants (on slow nights), doing outside-the-bookstore events is a great way to gain more interest for your talk. Why? Because you aren’t competing with everyone else at the bookstore for your crowd. When you do an event at a locale that doesn’t normally do events, you’ll gather more people just because it’s considered “unique.”

4. Show up early and talk it up: OK so let’s say you’re in the store and there are a ton of people in there shopping (a book event dream, yes?) I suggest that you take your extra bag stuffers or custom bookmarks and just hand them to the people in the store. Let them know you are doing an event at such and such time and you’d love it if they can sit in. You’ll be surprised how many new people you might pull in this way.

5.  Customize: Regardless of what your talk is about, poll the audience first to see a) what brought them there, or b) what they hope to learn if your talk is educational. I suggest this because the more you can customize your discussion, the more likely you are to sell a book. If you can solve problems (and this is often done during the Q&A) all the better. You’ll look like the answer machine you are and readers love that. If you have the answers they’ll want to buy from you. I promise.

6. Make friends: Get to know the bookstore people, but not just on the day of the event. Go in prior and make friends, tell them who you are and maybe even hand them your flier or bookmark (or a stack if you can). Often stores have Information Centers; see if you can leave some fliers there instead of just at the register. Getting to know the people who are selling the book is a great way to help gather more people into your event. If your event isn’t in a bookstore but attached to a shopping area or mall, go around to the stores (and perhaps you did this when you passed out the fliers) and let them know you have an event and what can you do to help them promote it. If you can rally the troops to help you market your talk, you could triple the numbers of people at your event. No kidding.

7.  Take names: I always, always recommend that you get names and (email) addresses from the folks who attended. Sign them up for your mailing list is a great way to stay in touch with them and stay on your reader’s radar screen. If you have a giveaway or drawing, great! This will help you to collect names. If you don’t, offer them a freebie or ebook after the event. Often if I’m doing a PowerPoint presentation I will put together a set of them (delivered in PDF) after the event. Attendees need to sign up to get them and then once they do, I include them in our newsletter list which helps me to stay on their radar screen.

8. Pricing: Make sure your book is easy to buy. If you are doing this outside of a bookstore this is easy to do and will help your sales. I find that a rounded number like $10 or $20 makes for a quick and easy sale. If you can round up or down without adding or losing too much to the price, by all means do it.

9. Book pairing: One way you might be able to round up is by pairing your book with a freebie. When I paired Red Hot Internet Publicity with a second, but smaller, marketing book I took the awkward pricing of $18.95, bumped it up to $20 (so 2 books for $20) and quadrupled my sales after an event. Now the pairing doesn’t have to be a book, it can be a special report or even an ebook that you send to them after the event.

10.  Product and placement: As you’re doing your talk (especially if it’s in a non-bookstore venue) make sure that you have a copy of the book propped up in front of you so event visitors see it the entire time you are speaking. Hold up the book when appropriate and use it as an example when you can. This will help to direct the consumer’s eye to the book – and making eye contact with the product is a good way to make sure it stays on their radar screen throughout your talk. When I do a speaking gig at an event that allows me to sell books in the room, I will sell four times more than I would if the attendees have to go somewhere else to buy it so make the buy easy. If you can, make sure your books are for sale in the room.

11. Ease of purchase: Aside from pricing, if you’re doing your own checkout make sure that you have many ways consumers can buy your book. I take credit cards at the event, checks and cash. Don’t limit yourself as to what you can take or you will limit your sales.

12. . Post event wrap up: So the event is over, what now? Well, if you got attendees to sign up for your newsletter (you did do that, right?) and now it’s time to send a thank you note for attending and remind them (if they missed the chance at the event) to buy a copy of your book at the “special event price.”

Speaking and book events are great ways to build your platform, but if you aren’t selling books there’s little point in doing them. For many of us, our book is our business card and thus, if we can sell our “business card” we can keep consumers in our funnel. If your book isn’t your business card you still want readers, right? So the marketing both post and during an event is crucial to building your readership. While it’s easy to say that events sell books, they often don’t. I find that if you don’t “work it” you often will find your time wasted. Seek the opportunities when they are made available to you and then maximize them when they are, you’ll be glad you did!

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AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – October 6, 2014
October 6, 2014by: Paula
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Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. We have some great tips on writing, and getting published this week. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Writing

Hazel Longuet submitted Writing Tips: 10 Most Pinned Articles on Writing from my Pinterest Feed posted at Novel Experience, saying, “For the last year I’ve been squirreling away high quality content on writing and publishing, and storing my little nuggets of gold in Pinterest. I’d wondered which of all these gems were most popular, as identified by repins, but until recently there were few ways to find out. Then those lovely bods at Pinterest launched their Analytics a program that delves into statistics of Pins. So now I know which of the pins my followers like best and can share them with you.”

Susan Pohlman submitted Feeling Stuck in Your Writing? The Answer is Travel posted at The Review Review, saying, “Finding your writer’s voice through travel.”

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Chrys Fey submitted Naming Fictional Towns and Cities posted at Write With Fey, saying, “When you’re writing a book, you get to name your characters, so why can’t you name the town your story is set in? You can!”

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted 2 Literary Agents Actively Seeking Writers posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “Here are two agents actively building their client lists. Brent is a new agent at TriadaUS. Lana is an established agent with a list of clients that she is seeking to expand. In terms of genre, they are looking for just about everything.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/





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