Book Marketing Blogs

by Penny Sansevieri
A Christmas Gift from Afghanistan
December 20, 2014by: Penny Sansevieri
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A Gift from AfghanistanIt’s getting close to Christmas and I don’t know if you’ve noticed but people are getting testy. We all have too much to do and time seems to be shrinking. Will we get our cards out in time? And what the heck will you get Aunt Ethel this year, for the gal who has everything?

Though it seems like a very stressful time, we’re so fortunate to have these things to worry about. We’re lucky that we can plan a Christmas dinner or a fun holiday get-together. Long lines at the department store? That’s great, too. Because you know what? Things could be a whole lot worse. All you have to do is turn on the news to see what I mean.

Last week I was stressed, trying to get work done, my shopping finished, the cards sent. There were a million things going on and then I got this voicemail from Afghanistan from someone I’d never met and will likely never meet. From that moment on, everything slammed into perspective. Have a listen and see if you don’t agree.

 

Here’s a bit of back story on how I ended up getting this call:

Every year we send care packages to a group of military overseas. These care packages often go to smallish bases with less than 100 guys. We are able to do this with the help of a team member who has a husband in the Army. This year we stuffed Christmas stockings with chocolate, beef jerky, warm socks, books, DVD’s and all sorts of things we thought they may like.

I believe in doing this because well, it’s important to remember that regardless of how we may each feel about the war, these men and women go there to do their job. They are in harm’s way every single day and they do so without complaining. They simply go where they are told.

During WWII my mom and her family were all in Belgium, I have heard the stories, it was horrible. I remember when she told me about the first time she saw an American tanker and the US flag come around the corner. They were being liberated, they were free. The men who went there fought a horrible battle and did so without complaining. They showed up and did the job. Many did not come home. I’m grateful to the ones who fought then and saved my family and that gratitude extends itself to the troops who find themselves in a very different place, fighting a very different battle. So my own personal reasons for doing this go back to that time but whatever your reasons, just do it.

So share your gratitude. Send a box or a letter or a card. Remember them not just around Christmas but all year round. You have no idea what a small gift like that can mean to someone who is thousands of miles away, fighting a battle we thought was long over.

a-soldiers-christmas

 

 

 

 



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of December 15, 2014
December 19, 2014by: Paula
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Prepare for the New Year with insights from these top book marketing tweets to guide you, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include creating a marketing plan, pitching to book reviewers, strengthening your social media marketing, and more. Happy marketing!

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* 26 Tips to Strengthen Your Social Media Marketing

Change is good, and with a new year around the corner, it’s time to examine your social media marketing and make improvements:

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/26-tips-strengthen-social-media-marketing/

* 6 Ways to Resuscitate Your Novel

Writers have to learn how to remove elements that don’t move their stories forward:

http://marketingtipsforauthors.com/2014/12/6-ways-resuscitate-novel.html

Tip 34

* Four Tips on What NOT to Say (or Pitch or Do) to Get Your Book Reviewed

Authors always want book reviews, but many shoot themselves in the foot when it comes time to pitch. Learn what to do – and what to avoid:

http://www.amarketingexpert.com/four-tips-not-say-pitch-get-book-reviewed-tip-34-52-ways-market-book/

* 3 Ways Authors Can Stand Out and Market Themselves

It takes planning, work, and creativity – but here are some examples to provide some inspiration:

http://gingergelsheimer.blogspot.com/2014/12/are-you-serious-author-or-are-you-one.html

* How to Reach Readers via Your Library

Play the local card, by pitching yourself as a local author with a new book out:

http://www.selfpublishingadvice.org/local-library/

* How Your Self-Published Book Can Create Multiple Streams of Revenue

You can’t achieve much if readers don’t know about your books. Get some ideas for pre-launch, launch, and post-launch efforts to get your book noticed:

http://www.slideshare.net/KathleenGage/selfpublished-books-can-create-multiple-streams-of-revenue-but-readers-need-to-know-they-exist

* 7 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block

Get some practical suggestions – from an author – on how to get the writing groove back:

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/tip-sheet/article/62947-7-ways-to-beat-writer-s-block.html

* Why and How to Set Book Marketing Goals for 2015

Authors should set book marketing goals. These steps will help you create a strong plan to guide you in the coming year:

http://buildbookbuzz.com/set-book-marketing-goals-for-2015/

* 16 Important Publishing Tips I Picked Up at a Writers Conference

You always learn something at a conference, and one writer shares her top 16 tips:

http://www.blogher.com/who-wants-know-what-i-learned-writers-conference



5 Steps for Crafting the Perfect Book Review Pitch: Tip #35 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
December 17, 2014by: Penny Sansevieri
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Welcome to Tip #35 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books. So, ready? Here we go!

5 Steps for Crafting the Perfect Book Review Pitch

Tip 35Every author wants book reviews – they help build buzz, inform potential readers and buyers about your book and when done well, give enough information about your book to intrigue without giving away all the pertinent details. Getting ready for the review process does take some pre-planning, as we’ve previously covered in 6 Things Your Website Should Tell Book Reviewers About You (and Your Book) http://www.amarketingexpert.com/6-things-your-website-should-tell-book-reviewers-about-you-and-your-book/ and 7 Simple Steps to Getting Your Book Reviewed http://blog.marketingtipsforauthors.com/2010/10/7-simple-steps-to-getting-your-book.html.

Once you’ve built a list of reviewers to go after, it’s time to start pitching. While this may not be as difficult as achieving world peace, it’s amazing how many authors make some big mistakes at this stage, in everything from poorly written subject lines to impersonal (unimpressive) pitches to not providing the appropriate book details.

Simplicity rules: Your email subject line should be brief, yet clear. “Review request: (Name of Book/genre)” is quite effective. You don’t have room to write a novel on the subject line and you want the recipient to be clear what your email is about. This is helpful particularly if your email lands in the recipient’s spam box – a good, concise subject header makes it clear that the email is legitimate. Then, onto the pitch itself.

It’s important to realize that thousands of books are published each year so competition for reviews is fierce. The average new book, if it’s not heavily promoted by one of the major New York publishing houses, is not likely to get much in the way of reviews from newspapers and magazines. That review space has been shrinking for years, anyway. Meanwhile, there has been considerable growth in book blogging and reviewing online; but even with that growth there are still far more books being published than bloggers available to review them. Understand that most reviewers do this as a labor of love and make little to no money. Their review blogs are not full-time endeavors, but something they work into their already busy lives. Learning how to make the best first impression possible when you send that pitch is vital.

Personalize: First of all, most bloggers identify themselves somewhere on their blogs – if they don’t sign their posts with their name, the “about me” section typically lists their name or nickname. Use it! When you use a blogger’s name one thing is instantly clear: you actually took the time to find out who you’re pitching. That’s a big plus. Introduce yourself (briefly), and then don’t just ask them to review your book, give them a reason – have they reviewed other books similar to yours? Do they specialize in reviewing books in your genre?

If you’re comfortable having a little fun with your pitch, by all means do so – I once saw a pitch for a frothy romance that asked potential reviewers if they’d like to sin with a duke. Very catchy and appropriate for the book! But – don’t force it – if that’s not your personality, then don’t worry about it. It’s far more important to explain who you are, what your book is about, WHY this reviewer should be interested in your book and provide links to your website so they can follow up, learn more about your book and decide whether they’d like to request a review copy. They will follow up by clicking through on links, so make sure your website has all the necessary information about you and your book.

If you did your homework during your research phase you may know some things about this blogger that might help you get a review request. For instance, if they love a particular author and your book is in a similar vein, that’s something you can put in your pitch.

Basics count: Make sure you include all the basic book information in the email:

Title
Author
Genre
ISBN (the 13 digit ISBN of your preferred format, hardcover or paperback)
Publication Date (month, year)
Pages
Price
Publisher
And include your website link. (This should also be included on your PR, which you will send out with copies of your book).

Timeframe for replies: You may or may not hear back right away. Each blogger has a different schedule – some people check email daily, others may only check weekly. Be patient. It’s fine to follow up in a couple of weeks if you really felt you matched up with a particular blog and didn’t hear back. It’s possible your original email ended up in a spam folder or was overlooked (the sheer volume of review requests that reviewers receive is pretty staggering). After that, if there’s still no word, let it go. Seek reviews from other bloggers. If you do receive a “No thank you,” move on, it’s not an invitation to try to arm-twist the reviewer into taking on your book.

Additional pitching options: Fiction and nonfiction authors may take a different approach when pitching. For fiction, it may make sense to seek bloggers who review books in your genre; but if your fictional book covers topics that you are an expert in, you may have some other options. For instance, if you heavily researched the history of a city or a historical figure you may find bloggers who are history buffs who might be open to reviewing your book. Sometimes it helps to brainstorm a list of topics from your book, fact or fiction, in order to generate ideas of what type of publications or bloggers or reviewers you should target.

With nonfiction, you’re an expert on the topic(s) at hand and should look for your peers in those areas when seeking reviewers. It’s much more competitive in this realm, but instead of deciding not to pitch someone who could be a competitor see if there are ways for you to help each other – and use that as part of your pitch. You never know what kind of partnership you can develop if you don’t ask. Darren Rowse at ProBlogger covers this really well on his blog, and his blog is worth following. Two useful articles include:

* How to Pitch Bloggers – Make it a Win/Win/Win Situation http://www.problogger.net/archives/2010/05/28/how-to-pitch-bloggers-make-it-a-winwinwin-situation/

* How to Pitch to Bloggers – 21 Tips http://www.problogger.net/archives/2007/10/30/how-to-pitch-to-bloggers-21-tips/

* From Journalistics blog – What’s the Best Way to Pitch Bloggers? http://blog.journalistics.com/2009/whats_the_best_way_to_pitch_bloggers/

More pitching advice:

http://badpitch.blogspot.com/2007/09/ready-to-pitch-blog-take-this-quiz.html
http://www.midwestbookreview.com/bookbiz/advice/rules.htm
http://www.writing-world.com/promotion/reviews.shtml
http://www.midwestbookreview.com/bookbiz/advice/fivedead.htm

Additional information

While your PR piece is something you can send out to alert the world to your book and also post to various sites online, it is also a vital document that should be included with every review copy you send out. As a result you’ll want to be sure your PR piece – which should be two pages MAXIMUM – has your contact information (phone and email), website url, book synopsis, brief author bio and the book information you used for your pitch (the listing that includes genre, ISBN, publication date, etc.) You are dealing with very busy people who are deluged with hundreds of books a year and you want to make it as easy as possible for them to write about your book – and what’s better than having a PR piece handy with everything they could possibly need – from the book description to the about the author section, website link, book information and so forth? They’ll love you for it!

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AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – December 15, 2014
December 15, 2014by: Paula
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Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. This week features posts on writing and getting published. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Writing

Hazel Longuet submitted Gifts for Writers and Authors posted at A Novel Experience, saying, “Perfect Christmas Gifts For Writers and Authors. Trying to find the perfect present for people can be a trial and no-one wants to waste money on an unappreciated gift. Well luckily for you I’ve done all the heavy lifting and found a range of items to help you find the perfect present for the writer in your life. They will love them – and love you for buying them.”

writer at work

book marketing tips for authors

Chrys Fey submitted Writing Tips, Part One posted at Write with Fey, saying, “Today I am highlighting 25 of my best writing tips I’ve shared on my blog over the last three years. Enjoy!”

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted 22 Cookbook and Nonfiction Publishers Accepting Unagented Manuscripts posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “Here are 22 cookbook publishers welcoming proposals from authors – no agent needed! And, as an added bonus, many of these publishers also accept nonfiction in other categories. (Remember, non-fiction publishers want proposals, not manuscripts.) Make sure to read the full submission guidelines before you submit.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of December 8, 2014
December 12, 2014by: Paula
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Here’s a rundown of some top book marketing tweets to guide you, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include why rushing kills good books, whether hiring help or going the DIY route makes more sense for authors, working with book bloggers, and more. Happy marketing!

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* How Can Authors Stand Out on Social Media?

It may seem like social media consists of a lot of noise and little useful info. But you can use social media to find and grow an audience:

http://www.socialmediatoday.com/content/how-can-you-stand-out-social-media

social media networks for authors

* How Hurry Kills Good Books

There are many reasons for you to take your time writing and publishing your books. Think quality over quantity:

http://socialmediajustforwriters.com/hurry-kills-good-books/

* Self-Publishing: DIY or Hire Help?

Many writers hear that they need to hire professionals, but you can do a lot yourself – if you want to:

http://www.molly-greene.com/self-publishing-diy-or-hire-help/

* 4 Tips for Working With Book Bloggers

Bloggers can be very helpful when it comes to getting exposure for your book. Here’s how to find the right bloggers for your book:

http://writersinthestormblog.com/2014/11/4-tips-for-working-with-book-bloggers/

* Why It’s Good to Get Bad Reviews

Having a few not-so-great reviews for your book can give your book credibility:

http://www.selfpublishingadvice.org/bad-reviews/

* 12 Ways to Avoid Looking Clueless On Social Media

Get some great tips from social media expert Guy Kawasaki:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericwagner/2014/12/03/12-ways-to-avoid-looking-clueless-on-social-media/

* Email Marketing for Writers: Build Your List!

If you collect more emails, you can improve your email marketing and sell more books:

http://www.theloneliestplanet.com/2014/12/email-marketing-for-writers-build-your.html

* 11 Social Media Statistics You Should Have Known Yesterday

Did you know the most repinned images on Pinterest have multiple colors? Learn that and more:

http://sproutsocial.com/insights/social-media-statistics/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of December 1, 2014
December 5, 2014by: Paula
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Gain some great advice and ideas from these book marketing tweets to guide you, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include 15 reading and writing communities to find readers, 6 ways to jump on holiday sales, a writer’s guide to mental health, and more. Happy marketing!

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* 6 Ways to Jump on Holiday Sales

You’ve still got a chance to get some sales for the holidays:

http://writersinthestormblog.com/2014/11/6-ways-to-jump-on-holiday-book-sales/

holding out a gift

* What Authors Should Know About Amazon Book Categories

Did you know Amazon has a separate setup for print books and ebooks? You can select two categories per book, and here’s how you should choose:

http://marketingtipsforauthors.com/2014/10/authors-know-amazon-book-categories.html

* Where the Readers Are: 15 Reading and Writing Communities that Can Boost Your Platform

You may not have heard of some of these sites – like Scriggler, WEBook, Critters – but they could be great places to find readers:

http://publishedtodeath.blogspot.com/2014/12/where-readers-are-15-reading-and.html

* Frazzled, Overwhelmed, Swamped? A Writer’s Guide to Mental Health

It’s easy to get caught in the trap of trying to do everything. Here’s how you can talk yourself down:

http://annerallen.blogspot.com/2014/11/frazzled-overwhelmed-swamped-writers.html

* How to Optimize Your Pins for the Pinterest Smart Feed

If you want additional exposure on Pinterest, learn how to use the smart feed:

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/pinterest-smart-feed%E2%80%8B-optimize-pins/

* How to Sell More Books to the Right Target Audience

Ask yourself these key questions so your book will be noticed by the right people:

http://thefutureofink.com/target-audience/

* 10 Ways Authors Can Make Crowdfunding Work

You can use crowdfunding to raise money for your publishing project, and also collect pre-orders and market your book pre-publication. Here’s how:

http://marketingtipsforauthors.com/10-ways-make-crowdfunding-work

* Tips for Making Sure Editors Don’t Skip Over Your Email Pitch

Research reveals that email is the best way to pitch editors; and your subject line is what really matters:

http://www.mediabistro.com/prnewser/tips-for-making-sure-editors-dont-skip-over-your-email-pitch_b102912



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – December 1, 2014
December 1, 2014by: Paula
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Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. This week features posts on self-publishing, and book marketing. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Book Marketing

Hazel Longuet submitted Book Promotion: Networking for Introverts posted at A Novel Experience, saying, “These days authors must self-market their books for any chance of success and that involves a huge amount of networking – for those introverts amongst us that is painful but it needn’t be. With these simple steps even the most introverted can participate in the marketing field comfortably.”

book typewriter key

Erica Verrillo submitted How to Build Your Own Author Platform – From Scratch posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “You must start building your platform well in advance of contacting an agent or publishing your book. Achieving a following takes several years, But even if your name is not a household word by the time you publish, you can set the stage for future fame.”

Self-Publishing

Sarah Bolme submitted Indecision: A Success Killer posted at Marketing Christian Books, saying, “You can find articles on mistakes authors and publishers should not make all over the Internet. Here is one that is often not talked about.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Making the Sale: How to Sell More on Your Website: Tip #32 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
November 25, 2014by: Penny Sansevieri
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If there’s one thing I’ve learned in my years of marketing, it’s that no matter how much authors love what Amazon can do for them, they’d rather sell books on their own site than share a cut with the giant online e-tailer. Doing this, however, can be tricky.

It seems that every time we turn around, some big chain is admitting that they were hacked. If you were one of the millions who shopped there, your information could be in the hands of God-knows-who. With so much attention on shopper security, it’s leaving a lot of shoppers even more hesitant to shop online.

Last year, Baymard Institute released a staggering statistic: 67.89% of shoppers abandon their carts before completing the purchase. That translates to around $1.79 trillion dollars in product or services purchased online. Why does this happen? Well, there are a lot of theories on this. According to Shopify and the image shown below, this is a list of the top reasons that people abandon their purchase with you:

post1

Though I don’t disagree with this per se, I would take this a step further, because not only are security concerns at an all-time high, there are a variety of additional reasons you may be losing people. Also, how to get shoppers and keep them varies by industry so let’s look at the ones that will matter to authors and publishers:

Tip 321)   Overall Look of Site: There’s a high trust factor with a site that looks professional. I don’t want to buy from a site that looks sketchy. Would you? If you want to sell from your site, you’ll need to have one that’s professionally designed. I would say that this goes even before we start the shopping cart discussion because you won’t get anyone to even entertain buying off of your site if it doesn’t look like a place they’d want to shop.

2)   Checkout Process: I see a lot of authors (and even business owners) who make the shopping process difficult. I’m not sure why they do this or why their web designers recommend this. Every click you make someone do can cost you 5% of your traffic, meaning that if you require several clicks just to get an item into their shopping cart, you’ve now lost 20% of your traffic. Make the buying process easy. Put “Shop” or “Store” or (if you have one product) “Buy Now” on the home page so folks immediately know where to click. Visitors won’t take the time to figure it out. If they can’t find it on your site, they’ll go elsewhere and in the age of Amazon they’re likely to just default back there.

3)   Site security: Showing shoppers that their purchase is secure is also very important. Buyers want to know you’re taking care of their personal details so showing security messages – even things like “Secure checkout” make all the difference. In fact, according to a recent Entrepreneur Magazine article, adding security messages can increase a buy by 16%.

4)   Sign in/Sign up: I don’t know about you, but the minute someone wants me to create an account before buying an item, I’m usually gone. If you want folks to sign up on your site, have them do it after they’ve made a purchase. Studies show that conversion rates can increase by 45% if you allow buyers to shop as “guests” throughout their visit.

 post2

5)   Unexpected Costs:  We all know that Amazon has pretty much ruined us for shipping costs. Thanks to things like Amazon Prime, and other free shipping opportunities, most of us abhor these added costs. If you feel charging for shipping is something you have to do, consider offering free shipping as an incentive instead of a guarantee. Staples, for instance, offers free shipping when you buy a certain dollar amount. Other e-tailers have free shipping days, or, if you want to further incentivize site sign-up, you could offer free shipping to members only which would encourage them to join your site so you could remarket to them later.

post3

 

6)   Cart abandonment: Window shopping happens, even online. SeeWhy did a study last year and found that 99% of people won’t buy on their first visit to your website. This is why having an email newsletter, or some other benefit-driven giveaway, is not only important, but mandatory if you want to make the sale. Email newsletters allow you to remarket to your visitor. No, they may not buy on the first try, but a helpful, content-rich newsletter will remind them who you are and encourage a buy for later. It is a lot of work, yes, but so is building a store on your site that no one buys from. Alternatively, you could also consider pop-ups or sidebar messages that show up during the purchase process, offering customers 5% off.

7)   eCommerce options: I know many folks who have extensive eCommerce options which are great but also costly. Being able to take credit cards, especially if you are small, is an added cost you may not want to incur but, you may not need to. When we switched from our extensive pay system to just offering PayPal, we found that our shopper conversion almost doubled. Also, PayPal no longer requires users to register with their system so you can give your shoppers the peace of mind of using a secure system, without having to register.

 post4

8)   Love the Love: People like what other people like, which is why for most (if not all) retailers, you’ll see reviews and customer feedback right on the page. Most authors don’t have the bandwidth, time, or money to create a sales system that’s quite that elaborate, so adding reviews to the sales pages is very helpful. Adding reviews with a picture adds even more credibility to the page. Remember that your customer can, with one click, meander over to Amazon and buy the book there so give them a reason to stay.

9)   Pricing: If you’re going to keep shoppers on your site, you’d better up the ante on your pricing. We already know you need to ship for free (at least on certain days or with minimum orders) now let’s consider your “offer.” Maybe you just wanted to offer the book. Sure, that’s fine, albeit a tad boring. Sorry, but they can get the book on Amazon, too. If you really want to lure folks to your site and make the sale, you’ll need to give them a slam-dunk deal they can’t resist. As an example, when we changed the offer on our store page from 3 books for $20 to four, sales doubled. Keep in mind that there is only one print book that’s mailed, the rest are digital and delivered as soon as payment is taken so there’s nothing else for me to do. Digital product is easy to add on because there are no hard costs with it, beyond the initial creation of the product. So what else can you add onto your book to help entice shoppers? What about offering the eBook with the print book so they can have one for their Kindle and a print book in hand (something a lot of readers still enjoy)? Maybe you could pair your book with someone else’s e-product. When you take some time to brainstorm, the possibilities are endless.

In the end, what you really need to do is think of your website as a brick and mortar store. If you created any of these roadblocks at Macy’s, or a Barnes & Noble, you’d really hurt your sales process. Authors often assume that a website store is different. It’s not. We want easy, we want fast, and we want the best price. If you can bring all of these elements into your website store, you’ll increase sales considerably.

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AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – November 24, 2014
November 24, 2014by: Paula
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Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. This week features posts on self-publishing, getting published, and writing. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Writing

Hazel Longuet submitted Writing Tips: This Week’s Most Popular Writing Articles posted at Novel Experience, saying, “I’ve gathered together the articles that were most popular this week with my Twitter followers and Google + Circles. There are some great articles here that you shouldn’t miss.”

typing 2

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted 12 December Writing Contests – No Entry Fee posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “Writing contests can act as a powerful boost to your career. Agents and editors take note of who wins writing awards, and it’s a tremendous lift to be able to put “award-winning author” on your resume.”

Self-Publishing

Claire McKinney submitted Publish, Release, Launch: Some of the What and When of Book Publishing posted at Claire McKinney, saying, “When is the best time to publish a book if you are self-published? This post gives a general description/monthly breakdown of when/what books are released by traditional publishers and when is the best time for a self-published author to release their books. Also provides some publishing terms!”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/

 



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of November 17, 2014
November 21, 2014by: Paula
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There’s a wealth of information from these book marketing tweets to guide you, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include asking for book blurbs, creating Facebook holiday contests, implementing a social media strategy, and more. Happy marketing!

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* The Importance of an Author Marketing Plan

Developing a marketing plan to guide you will ensure that your marketing will have focus and be quantifiable:

http://marketingtipsforauthors.com/2014/11/importance-author-marketing-plan.html

* 4 Surprising Twitter Features Every Marketer Should Use

There are some really great features on Twitter you may not have discovered, such as embeddable timelines and advanced search. Learn how they can help you:

http://sproutsocial.com/insights/4-twitter-features-need-using/

* 5 Facebook Holiday Contest Ideas to Boost Your Sales

Yes, time is short, but these ideas are really easy to implement:

http://www.jeffbullas.com/2014/11/13/5-facebook-holiday-contest-ideas-to-boost-your-sales/

marketing plan envelope

* 7 Ways to Make Pimping Your Book for a Blurb Less Weird

Authors cringe at the idea of asking for blurbs, yet the endorsements can be valuable. Take some of the stress out of the process:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/holly-robinson/7-ways-to-make-pimping-your-book-for-a-blurb-less-weird_b_6146802.html

* 8 Essential Elements of a Social Media Marketing Strategy

If you aren’t sure how to set goals or determine strategy, here’s a guide that will help:

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/essential-elements-social-media-marketing-strategy/

* How to Get Your Blog Post Shared 1000 Times

Learn how you can make your blog posts go viral with this infographic:

http://denisewakeman.com/business-blogging-2/how-to-get-your-blog-post-shared-infographic/

* 10 Reasons Why Self-Published Books Don’t Sell – and What You Can Do to Ensure Yours DOES

If your book isn’t selling the way you hoped, use this checklist to see what you can do to turn things around:

http://thefutureofink.com/self-published-books-dont-sell/

* Getting Book Reviews (so sales can follow)

A look at strategies that can help you get more book reviews:

http://elizabethspanncraig.com/2555/getting-reviews/

 





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