Book Marketing Blogs

by Penny Sansevieri
The Power of Social Networks: Tip #27 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
October 21, 2014by: Penny
Enter Your Mail Address:

No Comments »

Welcome to Tip #27 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books.  Want the complete book of tips? Get it here!

The Power of Social Networks

Tip 27These days, you can’t go into a coffee shop, bookstore, or turn on your television without hearing about social networks like Facebook, and LinkedIn. These sites have exploded in recent years with members and an influx of money that’s kept them growing.

The idea behind social networks isn’t a new thing, but the concept of socializing online developed and morphed as more and more people spent time in front of their computers. The idea being that you could socialize, network, gather, communicate and meet friends in an online venue, rather than, let’s say a coffee shop. Years ago, before social networks, we met people in clubs, organizations, bowling leagues. We may not have had “profiles” like we do on these social networking sites but the concept was still the same: like attracts like and similar interest-based people gathered in places that supported these common interests.

As we continue to delve into this Web 2.0 world, you’ll start to see more niche social networking sites like those built for wine lovers, car lovers, and book lovers. The more focused a site can get, the more the network expands. And how many sites should you be on? As many as are appropriate to your message and you have time to manage. If you’ve got a book about cars then by all means, join the car lover’s network. Got a book about travel? There’s a travel lovers social network as well.

Social networks, also referred to as social media, are places where people can join and become members of an online community. And why does this matter? Well, for a few reasons. First off, consider the Internet one big networking party. As such, you really want to participate, right? So you show up at the networking party (in this case Facebook or LinkedIn) and you network. Meaning you connect with others who are interested in what you are doing. And much like a real-time networking event, you give first and ask for the sale later. In fact, in most cases you don’t even ask for it. If you give enough, eventually you’ll make the sale.

People join social networks for a variety of reasons: to socialize, share and/or self-promote. The one caveat to this is that social networks are not receptive to marketing messages or sales hype, but those sitting on these sites are looking for answers and advice. In fact your presence on a social networking site should be 80 percent education and 20 percent sales. Users on social networking sites want friends, mentors, experts and guidance. If you can offer this to a social networking site or sites, you can certainly grow your list.

The Right Way to Approach a Social Networking Site

There’s an old saying that goes: fake it till you make it. This is not true of social networking. You can’t fake anything. The best sites are those with an authentic voice. Social network members can sense an individual who is pretending to be just an “average joe,” but is really just looking for a quick sale. The worst thing you can do is constantly promote your book.

Users join social media sites to socialize, learn and get to know what you’re offering. Be helpful or be gone. That’s the motto of the social networks. Remember that social media (much like anything on the Internet) is a trust-based model. You gain trust by helping, advising, educating, or enlightening your readers. Offer helpful advice, tips and insights; Be helpful first and a sales person second. The point is, gain someone’s trust and you’ll probably gain a sale, too.

Tips for Social Networking Sites

The first piece of this is to figure out what your message will be online. If you’re going to expose details of your brand, book, business, or life, figure out what you want to expose or, I should say, what’s necessary to expose in order to get your message across. This is important because once you start branding yourself on the ‘Net via social networks, you want to be consistent.

Next, remember that the first word in social networks is “social,” that being said, these networks only work if you interact with them. Whenever appropriate (and this will vary from network to network), join groups, be sociable, be interactive. Participate. You can’t just show up at a party and sit in the corner. Well, you can, but you probably won’t get asked back.

If you can spend a half an hour to an hour or so a day on your networks, that’s great. Don’t overdo the time you spend on them or you’ll burn yourself out. If you can use the social network feeds to have them syndicate your blog to the site, the updating of your social networking page will be done for you, to a greater degree, anyway. You’ll still want to get in there and tinker, update content, add friends, etc.

Fan Pages and Facebook

Since Facebook is a dominating force out there, let’s talk for a moment about Fan Pages. Why would you want one? Well first off, you’re in the business of marketing and as such, Fan Pages are business pages, so you’ll really want to consider pulling your book followers off of your profile and sending them to your Fan Page. Also, Fan Pages are indexed and searched by Google so you’ll get great ranking with a Fan Page, more so than you would with a Profile.

Fan Pages, once you know your focus and message, are easy to create and update. You just want to stay on message and know what your followers want.

Tips for Effective Social Networking

Leverage other social media: If you have a strong presence on another social networking site like Twitter or YouTube, then I recommend that you use that to promote your Facebook Fan Page. Let folks know where to find you and never, ever forget to add “Follow Me” buttons to your website pages and your blog.

Tagging: You can drive more interest to your page by tagging an author or a popular Facebook page to a status update, photo, or video. It’s easy to do this in Facebook; you can also tag an article that a high profile member ran on their page.

Step outside of your social circle: Try getting away from your inner circle and migrating out to other people who might be good networking opportunities. While it’s fun to stay connected to all your college buddies, that’s not the main focus of your Facebook page.

Selling on Facebook: Facebook now has an application that can add a store page to your Facebook Fan Page. What this means is that you can start selling your books and products from your Fan Page.

Slow and steady wins the social media race: The best Facebook pages (and this is true for any social networking site) are built over time. Slow growth is best when it comes to social networking sites, so don’t force a sudden surge of growth. This will also keep you from getting booted off if you add friends too quickly. Facebook watches for people who are adding hundreds of friends at a time and will lock your page if they think you’re over-promoting yourself.

Don’t be shy: The purpose of Facebook is to connect and interact with other members, so don’t be shy! Interact with people on your friend list by commenting on their news, and pictures, and/or wishing them a happy birthday. Doing all these things will help others to get to know who you actually are instead of just knowing your name.

Content, content, content: Remember that it’s important to add content. You can do this by uploading a video, adding the RSS feed from your blog, and a variety of other things.

Keep updating your Page or Profile: Don’t let your profile get stale. Update your status, add photos, and answer wall messages and emails.

Add your Facebook page to your blog: Make sure and add your Facebook page to your blog. You can have your web person take care of this for you; it’s a simple widget that gets added to let people know you have a Facebook profile.

Social media is a great way to market yourself and your book. When Facebook is integrated with other social networking platforms like Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn, it can be an enormous boom to your inbound marketing campaign. Just remember, your website needs to convert the folks you’re sending there.

Share this article with these tweetables:



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – October 20, 2014
October 20, 2014by: Paula
Enter Your Mail Address:

No Comments »

Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. This week features some insights on getting published, writing, and book marketing. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Book Marketing

Sarah Bolme submitted Learning From the Numbers posted at Marketing Christian Books, saying, “The newest figures from book sales (new, not used books) for the first half of 2014 (January to June) were released last week. I find this book sales data interesting and relevant for authors and publishers as you plan your publishing endeavors.”

book cash fountain pen

Writing

Chrys Fey submitted Correct Grammar Uses posted at Write With Fey, saying, “Grammar confuses many people, and countless people use words and phrases incorrectly. This post is meant to clear up some of that confusion by highlighting the words and phrases that are most often used incorrectly.”

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted 2 New Agents Seeking Writers posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “Here are two new agents actively seeking clients. Julie Gwinn is looking for Christian and inspirational. Patricia Nelson is looking for literary and commercial fiction.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of October 13, 2014
October 17, 2014by: Paula
Enter Your Mail Address:

2 Comments »

Grow your expertise with insights from these book marketing tweets, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include creating query letters and cover letters, finding free images, getting website traffic, and more. Happy marketing!

**************

* How to Get Traffic to Your Author Website: 30+ Tips for Discouraged Writers

It does take time to get visitors to your site, and it’s not about numbers, it’s about attracting the right people:

http://www.yourwriterplatform.com/author-website-traffic/

* Finding Twitter Chats for Writers

Twitter chats offer a chance to connect with readers, learn from other authors, network with industry professionals, and more:

http://badredheadmedia.com/2014/07/31/finding-twitter-chats-guest-k8tilton/

tweet

* Book Contests for Indie Authors

Your self-published book can gain an edge if you win an award. Here are contests to consider:

http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/book-contests-for-indie-authors.html

* Query and Cover Letters 101: The Fundamentals

This is a great post for beginners. Learn the difference between query letters and cover letters and how to write them:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/14/cover-letters_n_5317669.html

* The Best Places to Find Free, High-Resolution Images

Here are 18 sites you can check out:

http://www.labnol.org/internet/find-free-images/24990/

* How to Deal With Negative Reviews of Our Books

No one likes negative reviews. But bookmark this post to guide you if, or when, you receive a bad review:

http://blog.marketingtipsforauthors.com/2009/08/how-to-deal-with-negative-reviews-of.html

* How to Fail at Being a Writer

These steps are guaranteed to lead to failure. And it never hurts to have a little laugh:

http://kelsye.com/fail-at-being-a-writer/

* 4 Ways Authors Can Rock on Twitter

Many authors find Twitter is a great way to connect with their audience. Here’s how you can look like a pro:

http://www.thebookdesigner.com/2014/08/4-ways-authors-can-rock-on-twitter/



Tips for Making an SEO Friendly Video
October 16, 2014by: Penny
Enter Your Mail Address:

No Comments »

Did you know that when you create a video for YouTube that it’s automatically transcribed? This means that using keywords in your conversation can really help to spark visibility to your video. Of course, you want to also include keywords in your title and description, too!

Amp Up Your Video Description

SEO Friendly Video - blog_pin

Did you know that the most important part of your video description are the first 1-2 sentences? Why? Because this is what YouTube displays in search results. These two sentences are very important. Plug in keywords and great content that will get viewers to “click”

Video Did You Know?

 

You have about 15 seconds to convince your viewer to keep watching your video. Better grab their interest early!

Video Call-to-Action

Make sure and provide a CTA (call-to-action) at the end of your video. Get them to do something, sign up, subscribe to your channel, Like your Facebook Page – whatever. Sometimes the simple action of asking can actually get you what you want.

Share this article with these tweetables:



How to Monetize Free: Tip #26 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
October 14, 2014by: Penny
Enter Your Mail Address:

No Comments »

Welcome to Tip #26 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books.  So, ready? Here we go!

How to Monetize “Free”

Tip 26These days, everyone talks about free content. “Give it away!” they say, but does this really work? Well, yes and no. As with anything, there has to be a strategy.

Last Saturday I was on my morning run through our neighborhood and I noticed a number of garage sale signs (that’s tag sale for those of you back east). One of the signs had a sign beneath it that read: We have free stuff! As I ran though the neighborhood I passed that house and noticed they put all their free stuff in the “Free zone” and already, even at that early hour, hoards of people were migrating there. I passed the other garage sales which were doing OK, but not great. Clearly the one with the free stuff pulled more people, but did it actually sell more paid merchandise? Yes. I checked in with the sale after my run to find most of the good stuff gone (note to self: shop first, exercise later). When I talked to the homeowner they said that the free stuff went fast, but as I noted each time I passed by, it wasn’t junk stuff, it was actually good enough to make the garage sale shopper feel like they got a real deal. If it’s junk and it’s free, it doesn’t really matter.

What’s the lesson here? Free stuff can help you sell more of the paid merchandise, but you have to be careful, because some people just want freebies and that’s fine, but they are not your customers. Here are some tips to help you maximize the use of free:

1. Why free? The first question you should ask yourself is why are you doing this?  If you aren’t sure, then free might not be right for you. Free content should be offered to help further your message, build a list, and get new people into your marketing funnel. If your model isn’t set up this way, maybe it should be. If you aren’t interested in this kind of a marketing model, then free probably isn’t your thing.

2. Define how free can help: Figure out why you want to give free stuff. As I mentioned above, getting clear about your model will help determine if a free product is even worth your time. If it is, then you need to figure out how it will help you. As an example, we have a lot of free stuff on the Author Marketing Experts, Inc. site (http://www.amarketingexpert.com) but the free for us is designed to build trust. Distrust is rampant online, and in particular, in the book promotion and publishing industry. There are a lot of scams out there and so trust is important. Our free stuff builds our mailing list, yes, but it also builds trust.

3. Make sure it’s really free: A lot of people have content that is purported to be free when it’s not really free. What I mean is that you get a sliver of it, not even a piece really worth mentioning, but the stuff you want is something you have to pay for. If you want to do free, make it free. Find something of value and give it to your customers.

4. Make it something your end user wants: As I’ve mentioned a few times, make sure the free is something people want. If it isn’t, you a) won’t bring in the right crowd of people (you’ll end up just getting the freebie hunters, and b) you won’t build your mailing list as fast. So, for example, give your readers something really substantial like an e-book or tips, or a workbook. Virtually any electronic product is easy to create and deliver. When I changed our freebie on the Author Marketing Experts, Inc. website, we quadrupled our sign-ups. So, what was the freebie? 52 Ways to Sell More Books. Now, as an author, isn’t that appealing to you? Exactly my point.

So, what if you’ve written a fiction book? Well, consider this: 83% of Americans want to write a book, so what if you gave them a free how-to guide? You don’t even have to create this yourself, you could partner with someone who has already created this. If you don’t like that idea, consider (for those of you in the historical fiction market) doing a did-you-know piece on the history you’re referencing in your book. The idea here is to a) give value, and b) give your readers something they will care about. Also, whenever possible, give your readers something they need to keep so it will remind them of you and your book: tip sheets, workbooks, reference charts. All of these things are pieces that your consumer may keep, which can keep you top of mind.

  1. Take names:  You should never give free away without asking for an email address. I see people do this all the time; they have a ton of free stuff but never collect emails. If that’s the case, the freebies you are offering may be of great value to your end user but they won’t matter to your marketing. Get emails. It’s called an ethical bribe. You get something (their email) and give them something (the free stuff).
  2. Make it easy to get: Don’t make free difficult. What I mean is make it easy to get your free stuff. If people have to jump through hoops, they won’t do it and the free stuff won’t matter. For example – put your free stuff on your home page, or at least have a link to it, though I recommend using free stuff as an ethical bribe (as a way to get sign-ups for your newsletter). When you ask for their email, make it easy. A simple click or two is all it should take. Then, don’t ask for too much information. If you ask me for my address, birthday, and whatnot I doubt I will want your free stuff that badly. Shorten the staircase. If you make it complicated, it’s not really free. Just bait. If you bait your consumer in this fashion you’ll lose them.
  3. Make the free stuff work for you: If you give away something, make sure that it works for you. What I mean is that when you get our free stuff, we always make sure and remind folks of who we are and what we do. For a while we had a free Twitter e-book that always went out with our product catalog imbedded in it.
  4. Call to action: Make sure that your free stuff has a call to action. You are collecting names and email addresses and building your list, that’s great. But what do you really want people to do? Define what you want them to do, and then include your call to action in the free stuff. Let’s face it, it’s a good piece – designed to help your reader – but it must also help you. It’s ok to promote your book on the last page, or encourage folks to do a consult with you if that’s what you offer. You can also offer specials and change these periodically in the giveaway.
  5. What will you give? People often ask me what you should give away, and I say, it depends: Who is your market and what do they want? Now, on our site you’ll see 52 Ways to Sell More Books, which is an e-book we offer when you sign up for our newsletter. Do our folks want that? You bet. Why? Because they are authors and authors want to sell more books. A special report or e-book always makes a great freebie, maybe you have a white paper that you did on the industry; if so, offer it as a freebie.
  6. Follow up! The best kind of free stuff is, as I like to call it, the gift that keeps giving. Auto responders are a great system but often underutilized when it comes to marketing. If you are collecting names and then never contacting your prospects again, what’s the point? Our 52 Ways to Sell More Books is delivered over several weeks, and then when we’re done, we deliver more quality content. People need to be reminded, and reminded again. Now, you can also funnel folks into your newsletter as I mentioned earlier. I do both. We have the auto responder and the newsletter. Think it’s too much? Maybe, but our market wants information. Define what your market wants and then give it to them. If a newsletter and an auto responder is overkill, then scale it back. No one knows your market like you do.

The real key here is that free stuff can work well for you in so many ways, but free stuff without a goal is just free. Great to get free stuff, right? But then how is all of this hard work going to pay off for you?

If you still aren’t a believer of free, try it for 90 days and see if it doesn’t change your life. If you do it right, free will monetize your audience like nothing else will. The biggest reason is that in an age of pushing things on consumers, your audience really wants to sample what you have to offer before they buy. Free is a great way to do that. It’s also a great way to stay in front of your audience, build trust, and develop a loyal following.

Share this article with these tweetables:



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – October 13, 2014
October 13, 2014by: Paula
Enter Your Mail Address:

No Comments »

Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. We’ve got some great posts on book marketing, self-publishing, and getting published this week. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Book Marketing

Sarah Bolme submitted Sampling: An Effective Marketing Tool posted at Marketing Christian Books, saying, “One of the things I really enjoy about my monthly trip to Costco is all the samples I get to munch on while I peruse the aisles and shop. A few of these samples have even convinced me to buy the products being hawked.”

Kimberly Grabas submitted How to Get Traffic to Your Author Website: 30+ Tips for Discouraged Writers posted at Your Writer Platform, saying, “It’s time to address one of the biggest complaints I get from writers about their author websites: ‘My blog is a ghost town! How do I get more traffic to my site?’ Obviously, no visitors means no visibility, no way for people to discover and share your content, and no real benefit to slugging away, post after post, crafting brilliance that nobody reads. But your author website can be a foundational element to building a powerful platform, if you know how to attract the “right” people to your site AND retain as many of them as possible. Interested in learning how? I’ve got you covered. ;-)

clock 2

Frances Caballo submitted How to Stop Wasting Time and Focus Your Book Marketing posted at Social Media Just for Writers, saying, “I used to tell my audiences that they needed to diversify their social media to reach their audience wherever they might be. I no longer give that advice. Instead, it’s important to determine which social platforms your audience uses and invest your energies strategically. By doing this, authors will be more focused in their marketing and have more time to write.”

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted Beggars Can Be Choosers – How to Pick an Agent posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “When an agent offers to represent a writer, there is tendency to say “Yes, a thousand times yes!” before giving the long-term consequences of the union the cold, hard reflection it deserves. Here are a few tips to help you evaluate an agent before you get hitched.”

Self-Publishing

Hazel Longuet submitted Why are you reading this blog? Go read ‘Write. Publish. Repeat.’ – a must read for all Indie Authors posted at A Novel Experience, saying, “Sometimes you stumble on something akin to the Holy Grail by sheer accident. Something so big, so powerful that it forever changes the way you think and act. I have to believe that the universe only puts things in front of you when you are ready for them, I just wish I’d been ready earlier for Write. Publish. Repeat. It’s simply a must read.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/



Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of October 6, 2014
October 10, 2014by: Paula
Enter Your Mail Address:

No Comments »

We’ve collected some of the most informative and popular book marketing tweets to provide some tips, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include memoir writing tips, how to use SlideShare for social sharing, ways to make your media pitch irresistible, and more. Happy marketing!

**************

* How to Stop Wasting Time and Focus Your Book Marketing

You do not have to be active on every social media site. Instead, choose wisely so you focus on the sites that work for you:

http://socialmediajustforwriters.com/stop-wasting-time-focus-book-marketing/

blog button

* The Secrets Behind Book Categories on Amazon

What you should know when selecting your book’s categories:

http://www.amarketingexpert.com/secret-book-categories-amazon/

* 7 Ways to Add Sizzle to Your Next Book Event

There’s so much more than bookstore events. Here’s how you can have a great book launch party:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/7-ways-to-add-sizzle-to-your-next-book-event

* Make Your Media Pitches Irresistible Using These Insider Secrets

Get the scoop from a former CBS news executive so you can make your pitches count:

http://www.vocus.com/blog/batt-humphreys-insider-secrets-to-the-perfect-pitch-webinar-recap/

* 40+ Resources & Tools to Take Your Blogging & Social Media Marketing to the Next Level

If you haven’t started a blog, this guide will walk you through the process. It’s easy!

http://www.jeffbullas.com/resources/

* 6 Tips for Avoiding Writer’s Block

These tricks of the trade can help you get writing again.

http://www.socialmediatoday.com/content/6-tips-avoiding-writers-block

* The Power of SlideShare for Social Sharing

Do you use SlideShare? The site can be a great way to build buzz. Learn how:

http://www.webinknow.com/the-power-of-slideshare-for-social-sharing

* Six Lessons about Memoir Writing

Author Abigail Carter shares tips from a recent retreat:

http://kelsye.com/six-lessons-memoir-writing/



Two Fun Ways to Get More Traffic to Your Blog Post
October 9, 2014by: Penny
Enter Your Mail Address:

No Comments »

POSTED More traffic blog 10092014 - blog_pinWe all know that images drive more engagement, but what if you used your blog post image on your Instagram page, using it to drive traffic to your blog? Don’t forget to adapt it with text that tells what your post is about, you can do this on PicMonkey.com.

 

Sharing on Instagram is a great way to boost additional engagement and pull in more traffic.

 

Vine is another great way to pull in traffic. By creating a quick video about your blog post, you could pull in additional traffic to your site, too. You can do videos on Instagram as well.

 

Share this article with these tweetables:



12 Secrets to Selling More Books at Events: Tip #25 of 52 Ways to Market Your Book
October 8, 2014by: Penny
Enter Your Mail Address:

1 Comment »

Welcome to Tip #25 of our 52 Ways to Market Your Book! I hope you’re enjoying these tips and they are helping you sell more books.  So, ready? Here we go!

12 Secrets to Selling More Books at Events

So you got a book event, great! Now you want to maximize it, right? You’ve heard your writing buddies (or perhaps read online) about the lack of attendance at signings so figuring out how to maximize the event, regardless of the numbers might be tricky. While I spend a lot of time addressing online marketing, the offline component is one you shouldn’t overlook and if book events are where you want to focus, then bringing in some ideas to help you sell more books is something you should consider.

Some years back when I was promoting The Cliffhanger I ended up at a book signing in the driving rain, I mean it was pouring and the store was all but empty. It was amazing I sold even one book, let alone seven. While not a big number, the copies were all sold to people who were seeking refuge in the store from the rain and not there for my event. This signing taught me a lot about events and connecting with consumers in stores. If you have an event coming up, consider these ideas before you head out:

Tip 251. Marketing: First and foremost is the marketing of your event. But I’m not talking about the marketing you do in the media (though that is great too) I’m speaking of in-store marketing, this is what most folks seem to overlook. This is where you supply things to the store to help them market your event. Because the first phase of a successful event is driving people to it, here are a few thoughts.

  • Do bag stuffers. You can easily do this in your favorite computer program, do two up on a page, meaning that you use one 8 1/2 by 11 sheet of paper to do two fliers. You’ll want to ask the store first if they mind that you provide this, most stores or event venues don’t.
  • Bookmarks: While most in the industry see these as passé, people still love them. You can do bookmarks and bag stuffers (or staple them to the flier) or you can do custom bookmarks with the date and time of your event. Nowadays it’s pretty easy to get these done cheaply. Keep in mind that if you are having the event in a mall or other type of shopping area, you might be able to drop the bookmarks (or bag stuffers) off at the nearby stores to see if they’ll help promote the event.

2. Book signings are boring: Regardless of where you do the event, plan to do a talk instead of a signing. People are drawn into a discussion and are often turned off by an author just sitting at a table. Marketing is about message and movement so stand up and speak. If speaking in public is intimidating to you, go to Toastmasters or some other local networking/speaking group and see what you can learn.

3. Unique places: If you want to get more attention for your event, consider doing events in unique places. We’ve done them in video stores, electronics stores, gyms, even restaurants (on slow nights), doing outside-the-bookstore events is a great way to gain more interest for your talk. Why? Because you aren’t competing with everyone else at the bookstore for your crowd. When you do an event at a locale that doesn’t normally do events, you’ll gather more people just because it’s considered “unique.”

4. Show up early and talk it up: OK so let’s say you’re in the store and there are a ton of people in there shopping (a book event dream, yes?) I suggest that you take your extra bag stuffers or custom bookmarks and just hand them to the people in the store. Let them know you are doing an event at such and such time and you’d love it if they can sit in. You’ll be surprised how many new people you might pull in this way.

5.  Customize: Regardless of what your talk is about, poll the audience first to see a) what brought them there, or b) what they hope to learn if your talk is educational. I suggest this because the more you can customize your discussion, the more likely you are to sell a book. If you can solve problems (and this is often done during the Q&A) all the better. You’ll look like the answer machine you are and readers love that. If you have the answers they’ll want to buy from you. I promise.

6. Make friends: Get to know the bookstore people, but not just on the day of the event. Go in prior and make friends, tell them who you are and maybe even hand them your flier or bookmark (or a stack if you can). Often stores have Information Centers; see if you can leave some fliers there instead of just at the register. Getting to know the people who are selling the book is a great way to help gather more people into your event. If your event isn’t in a bookstore but attached to a shopping area or mall, go around to the stores (and perhaps you did this when you passed out the fliers) and let them know you have an event and what can you do to help them promote it. If you can rally the troops to help you market your talk, you could triple the numbers of people at your event. No kidding.

7.  Take names: I always, always recommend that you get names and (email) addresses from the folks who attended. Sign them up for your mailing list is a great way to stay in touch with them and stay on your reader’s radar screen. If you have a giveaway or drawing, great! This will help you to collect names. If you don’t, offer them a freebie or ebook after the event. Often if I’m doing a PowerPoint presentation I will put together a set of them (delivered in PDF) after the event. Attendees need to sign up to get them and then once they do, I include them in our newsletter list which helps me to stay on their radar screen.

8. Pricing: Make sure your book is easy to buy. If you are doing this outside of a bookstore this is easy to do and will help your sales. I find that a rounded number like $10 or $20 makes for a quick and easy sale. If you can round up or down without adding or losing too much to the price, by all means do it.

9. Book pairing: One way you might be able to round up is by pairing your book with a freebie. When I paired Red Hot Internet Publicity with a second, but smaller, marketing book I took the awkward pricing of $18.95, bumped it up to $20 (so 2 books for $20) and quadrupled my sales after an event. Now the pairing doesn’t have to be a book, it can be a special report or even an ebook that you send to them after the event.

10.  Product and placement: As you’re doing your talk (especially if it’s in a non-bookstore venue) make sure that you have a copy of the book propped up in front of you so event visitors see it the entire time you are speaking. Hold up the book when appropriate and use it as an example when you can. This will help to direct the consumer’s eye to the book – and making eye contact with the product is a good way to make sure it stays on their radar screen throughout your talk. When I do a speaking gig at an event that allows me to sell books in the room, I will sell four times more than I would if the attendees have to go somewhere else to buy it so make the buy easy. If you can, make sure your books are for sale in the room.

11. Ease of purchase: Aside from pricing, if you’re doing your own checkout make sure that you have many ways consumers can buy your book. I take credit cards at the event, checks and cash. Don’t limit yourself as to what you can take or you will limit your sales.

12. . Post event wrap up: So the event is over, what now? Well, if you got attendees to sign up for your newsletter (you did do that, right?) and now it’s time to send a thank you note for attending and remind them (if they missed the chance at the event) to buy a copy of your book at the “special event price.”

Speaking and book events are great ways to build your platform, but if you aren’t selling books there’s little point in doing them. For many of us, our book is our business card and thus, if we can sell our “business card” we can keep consumers in our funnel. If your book isn’t your business card you still want readers, right? So the marketing both post and during an event is crucial to building your readership. While it’s easy to say that events sell books, they often don’t. I find that if you don’t “work it” you often will find your time wasted. Seek the opportunities when they are made available to you and then maximize them when they are, you’ll be glad you did!

Want the complete book of tips? Get it here!

Share this article with these tweetables:



AME Blog Carnival: Tips and Tricks for Writers and Authors – October 6, 2014
October 6, 2014by: Paula
Enter Your Mail Address:

Comments Off

Welcome to Author Marketing Experts’ Blog Carnival. We have some great tips on writing, and getting published this week. Thank you to all of the contributors!

Writing

Hazel Longuet submitted Writing Tips: 10 Most Pinned Articles on Writing from my Pinterest Feed posted at Novel Experience, saying, “For the last year I’ve been squirreling away high quality content on writing and publishing, and storing my little nuggets of gold in Pinterest. I’d wondered which of all these gems were most popular, as identified by repins, but until recently there were few ways to find out. Then those lovely bods at Pinterest launched their Analytics a program that delves into statistics of Pins. So now I know which of the pins my followers like best and can share them with you.”

Susan Pohlman submitted Feeling Stuck in Your Writing? The Answer is Travel posted at The Review Review, saying, “Finding your writer’s voice through travel.”

writer typewriter keys

Chrys Fey submitted Naming Fictional Towns and Cities posted at Write With Fey, saying, “When you’re writing a book, you get to name your characters, so why can’t you name the town your story is set in? You can!”

Getting Published

Erica Verrillo submitted 2 Literary Agents Actively Seeking Writers posted at Publishing… And Other Forms of Insanity, saying, “Here are two agents actively building their client lists. Brent is a new agent at TriadaUS. Lana is an established agent with a list of clients that she is seeking to expand. In terms of genre, they are looking for just about everything.”

That concludes this week’s carnival. Our weekly roundup offers the best book marketing, self-publishing, writing, and general publishing industry tips to guide authors, would-be authors, publishers and others on their book journey. Submit a post to our weekly carnival by using this link: http://www.amarketingexpert.com/submit-ame-blog-carnival/





Page 1 of 14412345...102030...Last »